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IJN Akagi Official Build Diary page 1 Options
Tomick
#1 Posted : 24 June 2011 18:10:40

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The IJN Akagi was an aircraft carrier of the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN). She was originally laid down as an Amagi-class battlecruiser at the Kure shipyard in December 1920. Construction was halted when Japan signed the Washington Naval Treaty on 6 February 1922, when the treaty placed restrictions on the construction of battleships and battlecruisers. The treaty, however, authorized conversion of two battleship or battlecruiser hulls under construction into aircraft carriers of up to 33,000 tons displacement.

The IJN had decided, following the launch of its first aircraft carrier, Hosho, to construct two larger, faster carriers for operations with major fleet units. The incomplete hulls of Amagi and Akagi were thus selected for completion as the two large carriers under the 1924 fleet construction program.

Following Japan's renunciation of the Treaty in 1936, Akagi was rebuilt and, in 1939, her original three flight decks were consolidated into a single enlarged flight deck which ran the full length of the ship. This gave a greater capacity for aircraft and an island superstructure.

Akagi's aircraft participated in the Second Sino-Japanese War in the late 1930s,. She took part in the Pearl Harbour raid in December 1941, and the invasion of Rabaul in the Southwest Pacific in January 1942. The following month her aircraft bombed Darwin, Australia. Akagi took part in the Indian Ocean raid in April 1942. This was a naval sortie by the Imperial Japanese Navy against Allied shipping and bases in the Indian ocean. The Battle of Midway is regarded as the most important naval battle of the Pacific Campaign of World War II. The US Navy inflicted severe losses on the Japanese Navy. Akagi was so irreparably damaged during this battle that on the 4th June 1942, she was scuttled by Japanese destroyers to prevent her from falling into enemy hands.

The loss of Akagi and three other IJN carriers at Midway was a crucial strategic defeat for Japan and contributed significantly to Japan's ultimate defeat in the war.

The Akagi model: is a 1/250 scale replica of Akagi as she was in 1941 (full-length flight deck).

The kit parts comprise laser-cut ply, die-cast metal castings, wood, photo-etched brass detail parts, machine-turned metal gun barrels PLUS bonus tools to get you started such as paint brushes, tweezers, a file and tool pouch.

The hull is plank on frame construction and has a removable deck section for viewing the aircraft hanger deck. The kit also has nice touches such as guns which can be rotated and gun barrels which can be elevated. A complement of aircraft is also included such as Mitsubishi A6M 'Zero', Nakajima B5N 'Kate' torpedo bomber and Aichi D3A 'Val' dive bomber.

TV ad: http://www.youtube.com/w...edded&v=c0bQXwcW_dA

The assembly guide contains clear, step-by-step instructions, accompanied by detailed photos, to make building your model as easy as possible.

Available here: http://www.model-space.c...-model-ships/the-akagi/

Tomick
#2 Posted : 24 June 2011 18:42:30

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Stage 1 contains frames 15 & 16, keel plate 1-W, funnel castings and Mitsubishi A6M "Zero" aircraft kit.

The Mitsubishi A6M Zero was a long range fighter aircraft operated by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service (IJNAS) from 1940 to 1945. The A6M was designated as the Mitsubishi Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter, and also designated as the Mitsubishi A6M Rei-sen and Mitsubishi Navy 12-shi Carrier Fighter. The A6M was usually referred to by the Allies as the "Zero", from the 'Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter' designation, the official Allied reporting name was "Zeke". When it was introduced early in World War II, the Zero was the best carrier-based fighter in the world, combining excellent manoeuvrability and very long range. In early combat operations, the Zero gained a legendary reputation as a "dogfighter", achieving the outstanding kill ratio of 12 to 1, but by mid-1942 a combination of new tactics and the introduction of better equipment enabled the Allied pilots to engage the Zero on more equal terms. The IJNAS also frequently used the type as a land-based fighter. By 1943, inherent design weaknesses and the increasing lack of more powerful aircraft engines meant that the Zero became less effective against newer enemy fighters that possessed greater firepower, armour, and speed, and approached the Zero's manoeuvrability. Although the Mitsubishi A6M was outdated by 1944, it was never totally supplanted by the newer Japanese aircraft types. During the final years of the War in the Pacific, the Zero was used in Kamikaze operations. During the course of the war, more Zero's were built than any other Japanese aircraft.

Please Note: Official build diary images & text are protected under UK copyright law.

The official build won't keep pace with the rollout of this colection.


Stage 1 starts with the hull frame assembly, which involves fitting frames 15 & 16 into the two 1-W keel frames.

For now I will only dry fit the frame parts, and will glue all frames in place at a later date once I have all frames and keel plates to hand.

The two halves of the funnel were glued together with superglue gel, and when fully set any burrs removed with a fine file (which is included, and any joint lines filled with model filler such as Squadron white putty.

The individual aircraft are mini-kits in themselves, the first of which is the Mitusbishi A6M Zero.

The parts were superglued in place; I left off the bomb, leg struts/wheels, canopy and propeller to make it easier to paint the aircraft, which will be done later on.

That's it for stage 1.

The correct shade of grey for the ship is 'Kure Grey' (Tamiya TS-66 or XF-75)

Future stages:

Stage 2 - Includes frames 13 & 14, keel plate B2 and keel 3-W, plus photo-etched brass funnel cooling rails, and cast metal island parts.

Stage 3 - Includes frames 12, 12a, keel plate B1, Nakajima B5N torpedo bomber kit, and more island parts including glazing for the bridge.

Stage 4 - Includes frames 9,10,11, anti-aircraft gun turret & base, turned metal gun barrels, search lights, and island detail parts, plus two paint brushes.
Tomick attached the following image(s):
Akagi A1a.JPG
A1b.JPG
A1c.JPG
A1d.JPG
A1e.JPG
A1f.JPG
Tomick
#3 Posted : 30 June 2011 09:25:12

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Stage 2 - Includes frames 13 & 14, keel plate B2 and keel 3-W, plus photo-etched brass funnel rails and cast metal island parts.

Frames 13 & 14 are are added to the keel frames and a further keel frame added; the assembly is then set into the B2 base by aligning the mount pins of the frames into the base. I won't be gluing any of the frames until I have all to hand.

The construction for the island is straight forward other than removing the odd burr or casting mark with a fine file.

Care needs to be taken in identifying the correct funnel rails for each placement upon the funnel, these are listed a-g, and should be carefully cut from the fret one-by-one, nibs filed and them superglued into place on the funnel.
I left rail 'g' in the fret (for the funnel end casting), which will be added at a later point following the mounting of the funnel the end casting to the main funnel.

That's it for stage 2, carefully store the assembled and any remaining parts.

Future stages:

Stage 3 - Includes frames 12, 12a, keel plate B1, Nakajima B5N torpedo bomber kit, and more island parts including glazing for the bridge.

Stage 4 - Includes frames 9,10,11, anti-aircraft gun turret & base, turned metal gun barrels, search lights, and island detail parts, plus two paint brushes.

Stage 5 - Contains frame 17, base plate B3, along with further island castings, photo-etch ladders and set of parts to construct the first dive bomber aircraft - Aichi D3A "Val".

Stage 6 - Contains two 5-W keel sections, reinforcing plates, paravane platform & paravane's, winch and brass photo-etched railings for the island.
A 'Paravane' is are a form of towed underwater "glider", initially developed to destroy mines, the paravane would be strung out and streamed alongside the towing ship, normally from the bow. The wings of the paravane would tend to force the body away from the towing ship, placing a lateral tension on the towing wire. If the tow cable snagged the cable anchoring a mine then the anchoring cable would be cut, allowing the mine to float to the surface where it could be destroyed by gunfire. If the anchor cable would not part, the mine and the paravane would be brought together and the mine would explode harmlessly against the paravane. The cable could then be retrieved and a replacement paravane fitted.
Tomick attached the following image(s):
A2a.JPG
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A2g.JPG
A2h.JPG
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Tomick
#4 Posted : 08 July 2011 09:22:36

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Joined: 24/08/2009
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Stage 3 - Includes frames 12, 12a, keel plate B1, Nakajima B5N torpedo bomber kit, further island parts and glazing for the bridge.

Nakajima B5N (Kate) Carrier-borne Torpedo Bomber
The B5N series of aircraft (dubbed Kate by the Allies), was the standard torpedo bomber of the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) for much of World War II. While the B5N was substantially faster and more capable that its Allied counterparts, by 1941 it was close to obsolescence. Nevertheless, the B5N operated throughout the whole war, due to the delayed development of its successor, the B6N. In the early part of the Pacific War, flown by well-trained IJN aircrews and as part of well co-ordinated attacks, the B5N achieved particular success at the battles of Pearl Harbour, Coral Sea, Midway, and Santa Cruz Islands.
Although primarily used as carrier-borne aircraft, on occasion the B5N was also used as a land-based bomber. The B5N had a crew of three: Pilot, Navigator/Bombardier/Observer and Radio Operator/Gunner.


Start stage 3 by adding base B1 and frame 12, you will need to glue the two 12a frame doublers to the front of frame 12, setting them to the correct height as shown in the steps.

After removing any burrs or mould lines from the cast parts for the island these parts were then added.

The photo-etched brass window section of the bridge should be gently shaped along the fold lines and then glued to the inside panels of the bridge.

The island and its additional parts should be primed with metal primer and then painted before adding the glazing panels to the windows, I used Tamiya TS-66 Kure grey.

The glazing panels need to be cut as per the instructions and then added to the inside of the window frames.

The remaining bridge casting's which have been pre-painted are then added to the assembly.

The torpedo bomber kit was assembled as per the instructions, the folding wings are not intended to be operable.
I left off the torpedo, antenna, propeller, canopy and wheels for ease of painting later on.

That's it for stage 3, carefully store the assembled and any remaining parts.

Future stages:

Stage 4 - Includes frames 9,10,11, anti-aircraft gun turret & base, turned metal gun barrels, search lights, and island detail parts, plus two paint brushes.

Stage 5 - Contains frame 17, base plate B3, along with further island castings, photo-etch ladders and set of parts to construct the first dive bomber aircraft - Aichi D3A "Val".

Stage 6 - Contains two 5-W keel sections, reinforcing plates, paravane platform & paravane's, winch and brass photo-etched railings for the island.

Stage 7 - Contains frames 18 & 19, bottom plate B4, plus another Zero aircraft kit.
Tomick attached the following image(s):
A3a.JPG
A3b.JPG
A3c.JPG
A3d.JPG
A3e.JPG
A3f.JPG
A3g.JPG
A3h.JPG
A3i.JPG
A3j.JPG
Tomick
#5 Posted : 12 July 2011 14:48:10

Rank: Pro

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Joined: 24/08/2009
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Stage 4 - Contains frames 9, 10 & 11, anti-aircraft gun parts, search lights and island detail parts, plus two paint brushes.

Frames 9,10 and 11 are added to the hull framework.

Remove any burrs from the island castings, paint and add them to the island assembly as shown.

For ease, the port windows can be blacked using a fine tipped permanent marker.

Remove any burrs from the gun castings, these were then painted along with the gun barrels.

Glue the gun barrels into the gun turret being careful not to get any glue into the track of the gun barrel mount - then check the elevation operation of the gun barrels, then paint the ends of the barrels with matt black paint.

Locate the gun turret into the gun base but do not glue it in place.


That's it for stage 4, carefully store the assemblies.

Future stages:

Stage 5 - Contains frame 17, base plate B3, along with further island castings, photo-etch ladders and set of parts to construct the first dive bomber aircraft - Aichi D3A "Val".

Stage 6 - Contains two 5-W keel sections, reinforcing plates, paravane platform, paravane's, winch and photo-etched brass railings.

Stage 7 - Contains frames 18 & 19, bottom plate B4, plus another Zero aircraft kit.

Stage 8 - Contains frames 20 & 21, keel 8-W and three platform castings.
Tomick attached the following image(s):
A4aa.JPG
A4a.JPG
A4b.JPG
A4c.JPG
A4d.JPG
A4e.JPG
A4f.JPG
A4g.JPG
Tomick
#6 Posted : 19 July 2011 09:50:39

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Joined: 24/08/2009
Posts: 48,020
Points: -13,298
Stage 5 - Contains frame 17, base plate B3, along with further island castings, photo-etch ladders and set of parts to construct the first dive bomber aircraft - Aichi D3A "Val".

Aichi D3A "Val" carrier-borne Bomber/Dive Bomber

The D3A series of aircraft (dubbed "Val" by the Allies) were thought to be all but extinct when war in the Pacific began. The rude awakening came in the form of the surprise attack on Pearl Harbour (home to the US Navy's Pacific Fleet) as D3A's made up the principle attack air arm in that assault. Though appearing very much from an image of a bygone era of aviation, complete with fixed undercarriage in spatted housings, the D3A was used effectively as a carrier-borne bomber and dive bomber in the imperial Japanese Navy throughout the Second World War.
By 1944, the D3A was simply outclassed by the plethora of American fighters appearing throughout theater. Many Val's ended up as duel-control, two seat trainers while some were featured in Kamikaze attacks, the latter focusing in and around the area's of Leyte and Okinawa during the final year of the war.

Start stage 5 by adding base plate B3 and frame 17 to the hull framework.

Carefully cut free the photo-etched brass stairways from the fret. noting that you have two large,one medium and one small.
The stairway sides require careful folding inwards to 90 degree's, and the stair treads folded into the stairwell.
You'll find that photo-etch bending pliers such as those from Tamiya (shown in photos) make the task easier, and use of a blade tip to fold down the stair treads.

Remove any burrs from the cast metal parts and cut the antenna as shown in the diagram, then paint all the parts (including stairways), then fix the parts in place on the island at the points shown in the diagrams.

The Aichi D3A aircraft is assembled as per the steps, taking note of the handed parts; I left off the propeller, canopy and antenna for placement after painting, which will be done at a later point along with decal placement.

That's it for stage 5, carefully store the assemblies.

Future stages:

Stage 6 - Contains two 5-W keel sections, reinforcing plates, paravane platform, paravane's, winch and photo-etched brass railings.

Stage 7 - Contains frames 18 & 19, bottom plate B4, plus another Zero aircraft kit.

Stage 8 - Contains frames 20 & 21, keel 8-W, platform & platform castings.

Stage 9 - Contains frames 22, 23 & 24, paravane platform, Paravane's and winch, plus Tweezers.
Tomick attached the following image(s):
Akagi 5.JPG
A5.JPG
A5a.JPG
A5b.JPG
A5c.JPG
A5d.JPG
A5f.JPG
A5g.JPG
A5h.JPG
A5i.JPG
A5j.JPG
A5k.JPG
A5l.JPG
A5m.JPG
A5n.JPG
A5o.JPG
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