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The DeAgostini 1/8th Scale Ferrari 312 T4 Options
Plymouth57
#81 Posted : 10 September 2021 21:04:03

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Many thanks again to Kev and Roy!
I was pretty pleased overall with the way the fuel lines turned out, some of the photos to come show them as a little 'yellower' than they actually are to the naked eye but the close ups do look similar to the way my old Tomos moped fuel line used to look after a few months (that single one was only about four inches long from the fuel tap to the engine!) I must admit though that the effect is even better on the transparent tubing I first tried it on - the yellow is more transparent (and fuel like) too as opposed to the translucent tubing supplied on the kit. Quite pleased though and simple to apply in the end!BigGrin

So, Photo 11 shows the first of the four fuel distributor rings with the four fuel lines attached. Most of the rings have three lines but the shortest one on here goes to the fuel/oil filter later on. As shown in Photo 12, the ring slides down over the ‘chimney’, which is an integral part of the distributor base. The little tab protruding inwards prevents the ring going in backwards and it is pushed right down to the base as shown here. The three fuel lines are then taken to the first three fuel injectors under the air intakes following the excellent diagrams from the build instructions which clearly demonstrates each set of three lines in a separate picture! Each set of three fuel lines is shown in white against the blue ‘cgi’ picture of the entire engine block and their route from the fuel distributor to the injector is shown. This is not as straightforward as it might appear – the fuel lines have to thread their way through the HT cables which went on first, going under some and over others! The first three are shown attached in Photo 13. After that the second ring with its tubes attached was then slid down over the first as seen in Photo 14. Again, the inner tab means the ring will only fit in one way and as you can see, this means that the fuel outlets are staggered with the second layer being off set so the fuel lines have room to come out from the stack. The second group of three tubes then go to the other three injectors on the same side as illustrated in Photo 15. The third ring then follows in the same way (Photo 16). These tubes are routed off to the first three injectors on the opposite side, followed by the final fourth ring shown in Photo 17. At this point I decided to clean up the tubing and the HT wires by equipping them with clips as seen in Photo 18, (the actual instructions to do this come in the next pack along with the final part of the fuel system: the throttle, but having already read ahead to that I plonked them in now!) (Plonked is model speak for ‘carefully installed’!)BigGrin The instructions tell you which set of cables/tubes to clip together using thin wire. I did mine in two different ways, the HT leads were done using the metal staples removed from the pack cardboard labels, straightened out and bent round a large needle before snipping off the excess. I also used the staples to initially hold the fuel lines together as shown in Photo 19 and whilst they were held in place I then used the Decra Led lead strip to cut a thin piece out and wrap it around the tubes with a small drop of superglue to secure it in place. The metal staple was then removed leaving the neater lead clip in position as shown in Photo 20.
Photo 21 shows the three parts of the throttle mechanism, and out of their poly bags in Photo 22.
Strangely, there seems to have been an oversight in the instructions at this point – the throttle mechanism as mentioned is composed of three parts: the main valve body, the actuating arm and a little piece called the Valve Elbow. The instructions begin (after adding the last two fuel rings and tubes which I jumped to ahead of schedule) with the actuator arm being added to the valve body, there is no mention of the elbow being added on at all! You can make out where and how it fits in, from the photos in the instructions and fortunately I also had the image from the Haynes book shown in Photo 23. The upper arrow shows the elbow. That photo also showed two other things – first there’s a fuel tube coming out of the bottom of the valve body which doesn’t appear in the kit (though its possible the valve design altered during the ‘70’s and this is a later model) and secondly, the depression modelled in the upper part of the arm is actually a hole right through it! (shown by the lower arrow) Well, missing tubes are one thing, holes I can do! Photo 24 shows the arm on a piece of scrap wood. I first drilled a couple of small holes in to the wood, one is under the round depression at the end of the arm where the locating pin for the valve body is situated and the other is under the protruding nut and bolt. The holes are a tight fit and kept the arm fixed in place whilst I carefully drilled out the moulded depression, the result of which is shown in Photo 25. The three parts are shown ready to fit on after their blue-grey wash in Photo 26. The instructions have the arm fitted on first before the valve is slid into the top of the fuel distributor stack, but I found it easier (and safer) to push fit the valve down first and then move those ruddy fuel lines out of the way before pushing the arm in place as shown in Photos 27 and 28. By joining the arm on first there is a danger of accidentally snapping it off again as the valve is pushed down as that was another ‘tight fit’.
The final task is to fit the lower end of the arm onto the ‘axle’ coming out of the distributor base but as the photo page is full I’ll show that at the beginning of the next installment which features my newest favourite part of the engine so far – the Oil Filter (which is because it looks pretty and I managed to improve a part of it with a really easy scratch item!!) I like easy!Blink
Until then, stay safe and Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Fuel Distributor pic 3.JPG
Fuel Distributor pic 4.JPG
Fuel Distributor pic 5.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Markwarren
#82 Posted : 11 September 2021 09:09:37

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Looking very nice Robin. Those fuel lines really look the part.Love Love

Mark
Plymouth57
#83 Posted : 17 September 2021 20:43:57

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Many thanks for that Mark - they turned out fairly well in the end (but actually look better in the real close up photos!)BigGrin
As promised last time, Photo 1 illustrates the completion of the throttle control arm. The ring on the end of the arm fits over the lug moulded onto the axle shaft. That great bunch of fuel lines I’m having to pull out of the way actually end up being safely tucked away under the shaft later on when its all tidied up! Its then on to Pack 18 as shown in Photo 2 which contains the lovely miniature Oil Filter (or Fuel, its got a lot of fuel lines going through it as well as a great big oil pipe)Blink . The three main parts are shown in Photo 3, these are from left to right, the Oil Filter Base, the chromed Fuel Line Connector and the blue Oil Filter Cartridge. As well as these we also get two long fuel line tubes (one about ten inches long and the other a whole foot), a short length of oil tube and a much longer Engine Oil Line tube. Photo 4 shows one of the connectors on the Oil Filter base much enlarged – I’ll be returning to this a little later on (unfortunately)Blushing ! Note that silver ring around the oil filter cartridge, there’s a little moulded cylinder on the opposite side of it to represent what it really is on the real car – a large Jubilee clip as seen in Photo 5. This one is about the same size in fact, left over from a set when I repaired our Saniflo macerator toilet (don’t ask!)Crying I wanted to try and simulate the mechanism these clips use to tighten up and found just the thing in the good old DecraLed strip and a miniature drill chuck I use in the Dremel type tool. By rolling the chuck along the lead strip the finger grip indentations create a nice approximation of the square cut outs in the steel band and as you can see in Photo 6, by carefully cutting out a thin strip containing the embossing we end up with the bit of the band which protrudes from the screw. You might just be able to make out there are three indents in the silver band on the other side of the screw mechanism (on the right in Photo 7). These were simply ground out of the moulded band with the rotary tool and a sharp pointed conical diamond dust, engraving bit. This was done at a very shallow angle so that the tip created a square-ish looking depression (and it worked really well!) Photos 8 and 9 show my latest helpful gadget – an ultrasonic cleaner! I’ve always fancied one of these and Mum’s latest catalogue order fell just short of the free postage amount so I thought ‘why not’! As it happened, the cleaner turned out to be on a half price offer itself so it STILL didn’t get to the required amount! As you can see from the shape, it’s mainly designed for spectacles but its great for cleaning off the smaller parts with an automatic 5, 10 or 15 minute running cycle. After a clean (with a drop or two of washing up liquid) and rinse, and then a drying off, the parts are ready for the blue-grey enamel wash, after which, they appeared as in Photo 10. The blue cartridge is a simple push fit onto the brass connector, again, nice and tight so no glue required (Photo 11).
You can safely ignore Photos 12 and 13, I completely forgot I’d already written up the bunching of the fuel lines earlier!Blushing The next step is to fit on the longest of the black hoses to the oil filter as shown in Photo 14. This goes on fairly easy after the tube is slightly enlarged at the end like the HT leads were. Then the chromed connector has the little baby hose attached before being push fitted into the brass part of the filter as seen in Photo 15 – be warned – once this is pushed in it isn’t coming off again! I found this out to my cost as you’ll see after the next task, which is to fit on the shorter black hose with the chromed end connector as seen in Photo 16. Now came the problem! It was now the time to fit on the two really long fuel lines – the second one attaches to one of the points on the chrome cross piece which was fine, but the first is supposed to go on the brass connector on the oil filter cartridge. It was obvious from the start that the tubing was not going to fit the spigot on that brass part! I tried dunking the tube in hot water and enlarging the tip but nothing worked. In the end I decided I’d have to try and file down the spigot until it was small enough to fit the tube. That was when I discovered that the chromed part wouldn’t come off again. Trying to pull it free was causing the locating pin to stretch risking it snapping off so I had to try and carefully file away with diamond dust rat tail files, with the rest of the pipes still in place. Eventually I managed to get the spigot down to a size where I could get the tube on with a little help from superglue as shown in Photo 17. This was when I realized my mistake – it wasn’t that the spigot was oversized – it was that the locating spigot for the fuel line wasn’t actually there!Blink Referring back to the close up shot of the part in Photo 4, that black spot in the centre was the underlying black plastic showing through because the smaller locating rod was snapped off! There was nothing in the poly bag the part came in so it must have been damaged before bagging up at the factory. If I’d only realized that at the start, instead of all that filing down I could simply have drilled out the spigot and glued in a brass rod to fit the tubing! A pity, but the ‘adapted’ outlet doesn’t look too bad or different from the other attachments so I’m not too worried. But to those coming after and building this kit, check that locating lug first and do the drill and plug repair if required before attaching the chrome cross piece – it’ll be much easier (and neater!)BigGrin
Photo 18 shows all the pipes and tubes attached, and with the two long ones on, it is time to fit the oil filter on to the engine. This is again a simple push fit with a round hole in the underside of the brass part and a rectangular one in the blue cartridge, which fit over two corresponding lugs in the engine top casing. If you remember, on the first of the fuel distributor rings there was a short fuel line which wasn’t connected to anything. This connects now, arching over from the ring to the chrome connector on the brass piece, shown arrowed in Photo 19. The thick black pipe with the metal end connector is then fed under the distributor base shaft, back to engage in the pipe at the front of the engine block as shown in Photos 20 and 21. I found this hole to be just too small to allow the connector to stick in so I had to gently enlarge the hole with a round file. This was then slightly too slack so I fixed the pipe in place with superglue, holding it in place for a few seconds until set. The final connection from the oil filter (for now) as shown in Photo 22 was the (arrowed) little short black tube which runs from the chrome cross piece to a lug on the third fuel ring. Getting the end to engage over the lug was really difficult and so I eventually removed the tube from the filter, pushed the end onto the fuel ring lug and then re-attached the other end back on the filter – much easier to get at that way around!BigGrin
The next installment concerns another beautiful moulding – the big cooling system which sits on the extreme front of the engine – some more re-painting to follow!
Until then stay safe as usual and Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Oil Filter pic 1.JPG
Oil Filter pic 2.JPG
Oil Filter pic 3.JPG
Oil Filter pic 4.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Markwarren
#84 Posted : 19 September 2021 09:30:34

Rank: Super-Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of Honour
Groups: Administrators, Global Forum Support, Registered, Moderator, Official Builds

Joined: 04/01/2016
Posts: 5,748
Points: 17,525
Location: Northamptonshire, England
Very nice work Robin. Love Love Drool

Mark
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