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The DeAgostini 1/8th Scale Ferrari 312 T4 Options
RM1
#21 Posted : 04 May 2021 09:25:58

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Interesting update. I've been wondering about trying those Vallejo metal colours. Can't wait to see more on this build.
Malc.
Plymouth57
#22 Posted : 08 May 2021 19:40:42

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Many thanks to Trev, Roy, Carl and Malc for their kind comments and very welcome advice!Cool
Malc, those Vallejo paints are proving to be pretty good so far and I certainly prefer to use acrylics where possible (I just hate the longer smelly clean up required after spirit and lacquer based paints through the airbrush!)
So for the final step on the front wing it was time to add the kit decals. Photo 25 shows those decals, the ones with the light blue background. Behind them are the ‘spares’ I created by scanning the originals into my ancient Corel Printhouse graphic design program (Millennium Edition, 21 years old now!) Thinking back many decades to when I first began model making (Card and bagged Airfix kits of course), my first aircraft models always ended up with odd shaped roundels – I didn’t realise until later that the decals came off the sheet ready formed – I thought I had to cut them out right up to the edge, hence the slightly ‘un-round’ roundels!Blushing No such problem these days thankfully! You might be wondering why there are a lot of Ferrari logo badges included in my spare set. Two main reasons, firstly I might design a nameplate decal for the completed base with the car details etc so I’m thinking of having the Ferrari logo as a part of that. Secondly, some might have realised that the ‘raw’ chrome plated wing actually has a tiny Ferrari badge in the centre of the wing. After coats of black primer, semi-matt aluminium, metal varnish, dull aluminium and more metal varnish I have what’s shown in the cut out at bottom right. I found a clip art of the badge on the web and downloaded it to form the largest example shown here, then progressively reduced it down until I had the smallest size (black arrow) which I thought was correct for the raised location. In actual fact, when I went to fit it in place it turned out to be the next size up I wanted indicated by the red arrow, so I used the single example of that one instead (and then deleted the block of ‘too smalls’ and replaced them with duplicates of the ‘just right’)BigGrin . Why this badge wasn’t a part of the kit decals to apply at the same time I don’t know, perhaps it was considered too small a decal for first time builders to struggle with – understandable but more work!
After all the trials of the metal finish I thought the decal applying was going to be the easy part but I was surprised just how difficult it turned out to be! Admittedly, I was not exactly following the official instructions! They tell you to cut out the decals close to the edge, which I did, and then to soak them in warm water for 30 seconds before sliding them off the backing sheet. I was soaking the first of the Agip adverts in Humbrol Decalfix, which was at room temperature. After 30 seconds I tried to move the decal- no joy, after two minutes still nothing. It took about ten minutes before the transfer would begin to move and even then very slowly with the ‘glue’ very sticky to the touch. Placing the Agip in position was also more difficult as I had glued the end brackets in place before airbrushing the entire wing whereas the instructions have the decals going on before the brackets, which makes sense as there’s no obstruction in the way to sliding the decal off the backing! The other ‘slight’ problem is that the original chrome wing has tiny little placement marks printed on it to slide the decals up to, mine of course were under the same layers of airbrushing as the logo badge! Anyhow, I eventually managed to ease the decal off and into position where it received another brushing with the decalfix to seal it down to the surface. See Photo 26 for the first decal in place. For the bigger Michelin sign in the centre I put the decalfix into a cleaned out plastic butter container and sat it on the heat mat I use for warming my resins and plasticene. This was better but even then took a good 5 minutes to release and a couple of tries with the tweezers to get the upper edge parallel with the top of the wing. Last came the opposite Agip decal which I found slightly overlapped the Michelin so whilst still wet I snipped off a thin sliver from the left side to obtain the same little gap as with the left hand Agip to even it out. The three kit decals are safely down in position in Photo 27. Lastly came the little home made Ferrari badge to replace the painted over original as shown in Photo 28. This one slid off the backing in about two minutes! As far as the decals are concerned, I would say in conclusion if you are using the chrome plated wing unaltered, follow the kit instructions and place the decals first, if you are ‘toning down’ the silver like me, gluing on the side brackets first to airbrush the whole assembly is probably unavoidable but definitely warm up your water or decal solution first!Blink
The final part of this first section is to attach the completed front wing onto the metal nose cone. This is accomplished by a plug and socket joint secured with a single screw. The plug part is formed by the rear of the underside support bracket, which is shown in Photo 29. Ignore the ‘rough’ finish on the plug part – this slides into the ‘T’ shaped socket on the front of the nose cone illustrated in Photo 30. The fit is very snug indeed and the rough edges on the bracket are the result of test fitting it on the nose, and then pulling it out again! To secure the wing in place, one of the Type B screws is screwed down through the hole in the bracket into the corresponding hole in the nose cone below shown in the final Photo 31. I won’t be doing this just yet – the instructions say to screw it together and then put it aside in a safe place until later. I’ve just got a safe place – I bought a nice big ‘small parts’ carry box down the local B&M store, the sort with removable dividers to create large and small compartments. Take out two dividers and I have a perfect compartment for the wing to sit in – add the nose cone and it won’t fit anywhere! So the wing goes in the enlarged compartment and its nose cone with attached screw goes in the one next to it, all safe and sound.
The next section to begin is one of the front disk brake mechanisms but before that I’m going to try a bit of practice painting on the slick tyre to pick out the ‘Goodyear’ lettering and add some of the crayon/chalk marks that appear in the Haynes Manual photos.
Until then stay safe as always and Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Section 1 Front wing pic 6.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
tf64
#23 Posted : 09 May 2021 11:07:22

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Starting to show signs of a good build, Robin well done finding the clipart badge makes all the difference.

Regards

Trev
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Plymouth57
#24 Posted : 15 May 2021 20:39:04

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Many thanks for those kind words Trev! I'm quite pleased with the home made decals and you're right - it does make a great difference after burying the original under all that paint!Blushing
This installment will prove that no matter how big the model is - you still need that ruddy magnifier!BigGrin
Photo 1 shows the first of the kit’s rubber tyres (one of the smaller front pair). This one is a typical ‘racing slick’, which I’ve decided to have a go at picking out the lettering on as a practice run for later. I’ll be using the second set of tyres which come towards the end of the set of parts (and build) with the wet weather treads on. The raised lettering is shown up close in Photo 2, it’s composed of the Michelin trademark name, the tyre specifications and (not shown here) a moulded arrow pointing in the direction of the wheel’s rotation. Looking through the Haynes Manual on the 312T series, there’s a choice of finishes on these tyres. Either the Michelin and the specs and arrow are painted in white, or the specs and arrow are white with the Michelin in gold. Photo 3 illustrates the two choices for the trademark. Of the two, the gold one was actually the easier to paint, the gold example was painted with a 40 (0000) brush using Revell Aqua Colour Gold, the white version with the same brush and Mig Acrylic Colour Matt White. The gold paint flowed into the raised letters easier than the white, which took a couple of carefully applied coats, but there was a slight problem with the gold finish. Because of its shininess if the light was catching it just right it looked fine like in the photo, but if the light was off centre parts of it didn’t ‘light up’ and it actually looked as if it was either badly painted or even some areas were missing! This made me tend towards the white letters version until I thought about going over the gold paint with a drop of my Mig Ultra Matt Varnish. That did the trick – there’s still a slight shine to the gold but the letters all show up whatever the light conditions are. I actually had a different paint which would have been perfect - a forty year old pot of Citadel 'Shining Gold' which, despite its name was actually a matt finish. Unfortunately that pot has finally decided to go completely solid on me! A real pity as I've got quite a few pots of the same age which are still perfect (try that with the modern paints!)Blink The rest of the white lettering was much more difficult! Whereas the Michelin logo was a solid letter surrounded by a raised outline which was a case of filling in the letter up to that raised line, the smaller specs lettering is just the raised line itself! I had to go very carefully with the 0000 brush with just enough paint to leave a white line without ‘blotching’ onto the surrounding tyre. Carl (Darbyvet) told me he’d done similar tyres using a gold and white Sharpie pen – I had a look on ebay and guess what – the black and coloured pens are about £1.50 or so each, the gold and white – around £10 each!Crying Ah well, back to the old Revell and Mig acrylics then!
So, Photo 4 shows the all white version whilst Photo 5 illustrates my personal preference of the Gold and White combination. Also shown here is the hand painted ‘quick reference’ markings applied by the pit crew to aid identification in a hurry. The original photos seem to show these scrawled markings to be either yellow chalk or crayon but I used Mig Desert Yellow, which comes out quite nicely. These two photos are of course, both sides of the same tyre! The other tyres would be marked RF, LR and RR, each with their direction arrows.
As I was getting to the end of this practice session I had one of my ‘what if’ moments. Rather than ending up with a ‘spare’ set of tyres doing nothing, I could possibly use the second set as a ‘diorama prop’ for the finished base with a set of them stacked up beside the car! Now I think I’m right in saying that although you get a second set of tyres (the instructions for changing them come right at the end of the instructions), you don’t get a second set of wheel hubs to go with them so I may well go and make a silicone mould of the wheel hubs before putting them together for the model and then I can cast a resin copy to fit inside the spare tyres – well at least the top one on the pile anyway! Of course, I’ll have to do the same with the larger rear wheels when I reach that part and I’ll also have to think about painting the chrome of the wheel hubs too. I was intending to use the Humbrol Blue-Grey Wash over the chrome effect but I might need to paint that with the airbrush as well to match up with the resin spare wheels. The gold finish on the metal hub (coming soon) is perfect and will hopefully match up with the Vallejo Metal Colour Gold I’ve now sent off for – if not, oh well, more work!
So the next installment will be a bit of a ‘pit stop’ (see, I’m learning as I go)BigGrin with my attempts to create a spare set of wheel hubs for the front wheels. As mentioned above, if it goes OK I’ll have to do it all again for the rear ones too!
Update…It’s going very well so far!Cool
So until the next posting, stay safe as always and Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Tyre Practice pic.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Markwarren
#25 Posted : 16 May 2021 09:59:24

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Nice work Robin.Drool Love Just catching up on you build, looks like it is going very nicely.ThumpUp

Mark
andali15
#26 Posted : 16 May 2021 14:08:33

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Hi Robin, ref the paint pens, have you “ The Range “ store near you? I purchased the Uniball gold paint pens there for £1.99. Just a thought. Great work you’re doing. Andy.
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#27 Posted : 17 May 2021 07:08:32
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Man, I am happy you are having so much fun with this! It seems the kit went to someone who is gonna make a work of art!

Now, about those decals! You and Roy should pair up, and put them out via Roy’s eBay store. I know a lot of builders out there would love them.

Best,

Mark

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goddo
#28 Posted : 17 May 2021 07:50:01

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Belated congratulations on your win, Robin.
The diorama was a brilliant piece of work and now your build diary is looking very interesting.
Well done.
Chris
Plymouth57
#29 Posted : 23 May 2021 20:16:22

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Grateful thanks again for those kind words from Mark, Andy, Big Mark and Chris!Blushing Thanks for that Andy, I do have a 'Range' store in the area, about five miles but not on any direct route (other than my cycle), when the weather improves I'll try and have a look out there!Cool
Ok then, Photo 1 illustrates the next pack of parts. This is continuing on with the wheel, top left is the main section of the disc brake, then the two parts of the wheel hub, bottom left are the upper and lower halves of the air intake which cools the brakes, below the gold hub is a little bracket which goes on the bigger silver disc brake part (and later encloses the discs themselves), in the centre is a set of silver doo-dahs which go into the rim of the silver hub (absolutely no idea what the heck they are for) and finally, below them a set of Type A screws. I must check to see if these Type A’s are the same as the Type A’s from the earlier pack, at the moment I’m writing the section and phase numbers on the packets as I come to them. One thing I do like about this kit is that they give you a spare item or two in the small fittings bags – in this pack you need four of those silver thingies but you get five and there were a couple of spare A and B screws in the last pack too (which is why I’m labelling the bags!)
Photo 2 shows the two wheel hub halves out of the pack. The chrome one on the left is a plastic component and if you look closely at the 11 o’clock and 1 o’clock positions at the top you can just make out two of the holes for the silver things to fit into (and almost at 12 o’clock in Photo 3). The gold hub however is a big weighty metal casting with a pre-painted silver tyre air valve set into the bottom. There are four holes set in the bottom, two smaller ‘nut’ shapes ones and two larger rimmed holes. On the rear of the silver hub are four corresponding lugs or pegs. The small ones fit into the nut holes and the two larger hollow lugs fit the rimmed holes – this is where the hubs are joined together with the two screws. Unfortunately for me, the gold hub also has detail moulded on the reverse side as shown in Photo 3 which shows the two hubs in their joined position. The only way to cast both sides at once would be with a two part silicone mould, the problem then is the likelihood of air bubbles getting trapped inside. I decided therefore to attempt to cast the two hubs in three parts – a single mould for the chromed rim and a pair of moulds for the gold one. Photo 4 shows the first two moulds under way. The lego boxes each have a base of softened plasticene. The silver hub is pushed down to the bottom of the rim, with the four pegs buried in the plasticene. The gold hub beside it has been pressed down into the plasticene and the liquid silicone poured first inside it and then allowed to overflow to fill up the rest of the mould just above the top of the metal hub. Photos 5 to 7 illustrate the three moulds with the kit original parts and the resin castings alongside. Photo 5 is the silver hub. To cast the replica the rubber mould is pulled out slightly to allow the resin to be poured into the gap filling up the mould until the ring with the holes in it is covered but not the raised central disc. Because the mould is open ended, any air bubbles can escape easily leaving the nice casting on the right. Note there are no pegs on the replica! In Photo 6 we are looking at the bottom of the mould which was seen filled up in Photo 4, this is the part that was pushed into the plasticene. Again the mould rim is pulled out a bit to fill it up until the resin flows between the four raised quadrants and fills the central shaft. The casting is shown on the right, perfect apart from one small air bubble in the top rim (at about the 1 o’clock position) this doesn’t matter at all though as the entire rim sits inside the rubber tyre once fitted!BigGrin
The third section was a little more complicated. I needed to create just the detail on the reverse of the metal hub (with the tyre valve) and to do that I had to ensure the silicone couldn’t get inside the hub (effectively entombing the whole thing in rubber!) This was accomplished by pushing soft plasticene in from the back or inside as shown in the inserts in Photo 7 sealing off the quadrants, the central shaft and the four rim holes. Once that was done the hub was pushed down into a new lego box mould with a soft plasticene base and silicone poured in until the whole thing was covered under a centimetre or so depth. The resulting mould is shown in the middle, to cast this part, the resin is poured in slowly just until the quadrants are almost covered but not quite! This casting is so thin its best to leave it overnight before attempting to remove it from the mould, the others can be removed much sooner but care must be taken not to deform the hubs whilst pulling them out of the deep moulds (overnight is better really). The rear detail casting is shown on the right. Taken earlier, Photo 8 was the mould with the sealed hub in place just prior to the pouring of the silicone rubber.
So the result of those three moulds is the line up shown in Photo 9. You can see that unimportant little air bubble up the top more clearly in this shot (I love it when the bubbles are ‘unimportant’!) The most important part that comes next is the sanding down procedure that ensures that these three components have the same height as the model kit’s two parts but I’ll show that in the next installment. That left just one more small addition to model – those little silver thingies. The mould for them is shown in Photo 10. This one was slightly different in that I didn’t need a soft plasticine base, instead, I glued the four beadlock bolts (yes I’ve just re-read the official instructions again and that’s what they are – the silver hub is a beadlock apparently and the golden one is a wheel hub)Blink anyway, I glued them onto a narrow lego block with a tiny drop of Deluxe Card Glue and used one of my lego bases I found in the local B&M toy section, building up a small wall around them as shown in the photo. After mixing up a much smaller quantity of silicone than the other moulds required I ended up with the diddy mould seen in Photo 11. A pouring in of some resin later resulted in the set of bolts shown in Photo 12. Now unlike the big hubs, which were better with a longer cure, these bolts are the opposite. Removing the block from the mould after an hour or so, the resin is set hard but still soft enough to slice off the block using the razor blade in its handle as seen in Photo 13 – leave these overnight and the resin could become too hard to slice and would need to be sawn off instead. The beadlock bolts are shown fitted in place in the final Photo 14. I was really pleased with the way they fitted, didn’t need to even glue them in, just pushed them in from outside and they snapped into place with a satisfying click! The back of one of those bolts is indicated by the black arrow in the photo. Now it did occur to me that I could have simply put the kit bolts into the kit rim before I created the rubber mould (I forgot to actually) but those little protruding bolt heads in the rim are almost begging for an air bubble during the casting process so overall, with them fitting so well, I’m glad now that I left them off to add separately.
The second part of this section will see how the three parts of the hub come together after a few additions along with some of the pitfalls I came across designing the castings and the solutions I found (plus actually painting the things at long last which I haven’t got to yet).
Until then, stay safe, get your jabs (my second is next week, the day before I go to have my broken tooth looked atCrying ) and Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Spare Wheel Hub Casting pic 1.JPG
Spare Wheel Hub Casting pic 2.JPG
Spare Wheel Hub Casting pic 3.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
tf64
#30 Posted : 24 May 2021 15:48:40

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Hi Robin,

Well done with the casting it takes a lot of work on those castings in particular the small ones,
and thanks for posting the update.

Regards

Trev
Work in progress: Artesania Stage-Coach.


Scratch Build: Tombstone Arizona Diorama



Finished builds: Westland Lysander MK.11 plus large Diorama.





Kev the Modeller
#31 Posted : 26 May 2021 12:35:52

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Nice work with the wheel casting Robin and making good steady progress with the build already. I like that you are willing to admit that you're out of your comfort zone with an F1 build, and yet you are still willing to take it a step further by adding some scratchbuilt items and adjust some of the kit parts/colours to make them even better?!

Well done. Cool ThumpUp

Kev.
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kpnuts
#32 Posted : 27 May 2021 21:59:49

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Superb work going on mate.
Ken's the name modeling's the game.
Sticky Wickett
#33 Posted : 03 June 2021 15:22:15

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This is looking really good Robin! Love

Regards,
Phil W.
Completed projects: 1/43 scale Bedford HA van / 1/43 scale MG TD sports car
Current projects: 1/48 scale U-boat [U230]
Future projects: 1/148 scale railway diorama / 1/50 scale R/C Volvo F89 logging truck / 1/148 scale Thunderbirds Fireflash
goddo
#34 Posted : 03 June 2021 15:34:55

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Hi Robin,
good work going on there. Looks forward to seeing more progress.
Chris
Plymouth57
#35 Posted : 03 June 2021 20:37:26

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Many thanks as always to Trev, Kev, Ken, Phil and Chris for their kind words! Definitely outside the comfort zone Kev but its nice learning new things and how to do them - plus I just can't ever seem to build a kit 'straight out of the box', no matter big the box (and this comes in a BIG one BigGrin. Somehow I always have to add something along the way!Blink
So, with the three castings completed, there were just a few minor bits to add (or in the first instance take away) before the parts can be prepared for painting. Photo 15 illustrates the two wheel hubs together. Although it’s not readily noticeable, the resin copy is about 2mm or so higher than the kit original. The reason is those three parts instead of the kit’s two. The thickness of the separate top face detail when added to the rest of the hub has to be the same as the one piece metal moulding. I first measured the overall height of the kit part(s) and rather than continuously measuring the resin copy during the sanding process I decided to make a simple height gauge. Again, at first I was going to take a suitable sheet of plasticard and cut out a hole through which the kit parts would just slide through. Once the resin one could also ‘just’ slide through they would both be the same dimension. Fortunately, before I got to marking it out and cutting a perfectly good piece of plasticard to shape I suddenly realised it would be far easier and take much less plastic if I just made some 2cm strips, long enough to go along the top of the kit hub with enough overhang to poly glue a couple of legs on each end. The simplified gauge is shown in Photo 16.
Before continuing, another thing I had realised during the casting of the first trial hubs was that I could do with a better pouring cup! The need to pull back the top of the silicone mould AND carefully and slowly pour in the resin meant that the round mixing cup dribbled the resin underneath the mouth of the cup and all over the work mat. This didn’t matter to the mat as the resin can be easily removed cleanly with the razor blade tool once cured – but it was a waste of resin which is better spent filling up any little moulds if there’s any left over. I looked on Ebay and found a supply of mixing cups with little pouring spouts – only two problems, they were in China and they were 40ml cups whereas I’m using little 25ml cups which are quite big enough. The solution was easier than expected – taking a 25ml new cup I held the lip up to a candle flame until the plastic was seen to soften and then I used a thin wooden paintbrush handle to push down on the lip. After a couple of seconds of spinning the handle between thumb and forefinger to make sure it didn’t bond to the hot plastic I had a perfect little pouring spout on the previously plain cup as shown in Photo 17. I’ve used the ‘new’ cup to cast a new large hub and it works perfectly, no drips and easier to pour down the inside of the mould!Cool
The next job was to add the stepped hole into the centre of the gold hub as shown by the arrow in Photo 18. Because of the manner in which I had to cast the bigger hub with the extra detail moulding on the top, there is no hole down through the middle of the shaft. Because the hole has a flat shelf part way down I can’t use a ‘normal’ drill bit as that would leave a slanting shelf following the point of the bit. Instead, I needed a special type of drill bit called a “Forstner” as shown in Photo 19. This one had to come from Germany as that was the only place that had them on ebay in the size required! I had a set of five of them in a nice wooden box from the local Tool Box DIY store which I purchased some years ago to set the brass ID disk into the buttstock of my SMLE, but they ranged from 15mm up to 35mm and that’s a little too big for this task as you can see in Photo 20 with the 15mm up against the German Forstner– to fit the kit hub shown in Photo 21 I needed a smaller 8mm bit. This is when the fun and games began! I’d been working on the first casting of the hub carefully sanding down the thickness of the top until the three pieces would fit the height gauge and it was taking ages! I had to go slowly and carefully to avoid imparting a slope to the sanded surface (which I admit I’m very prone to doing!) I then decided it would be a lot easier just to cast another hub, this time ensuring the resin only just covered the top of the mould resulting in a much thinner layer requiring much less sanding! This was achieved and after just a few minutes of rubbing the resin hub in circles on the sand paper it fitted the gauge perfectly. The new casting is shown marked ready for the Forstner in Photo 22. The problem was I hadn’t realised that the new thinner top would also be much more flexible than old ‘ironsides’ the first one I made. Consequently, as I pulled down on the pillar drill with the Forstner bit I didn’t see that the centre was de-forming under pressure, taking the point of the bit off centre as it went down. The result was the chewing up of the central shaft as shown in Photos 23 and 24. Ah well, all part of the learning curve!BigGrin The solution, after thinking up many more far more complicated fixes is shown in Photo 25. A simple wooden pillar with a drilled out centre to accept the slightly larger bottom section of the central shaft, allowing the delicate cross spokes to rest on the wood as illustrated in Photo 26. The wooden pillar was gripped in the tool vice on the pillar drill with the Forstner positioned over the previously drilled guide hole as shown in Photo 27. With the pillar drill turned on the bit was slowly lowered down and a perfect stepped hole was produced with no de-formation problems this time. Once the flat hole was in I could then use the pillar drill with a smaller 5.5mm standard drill bit to drill up through the shaft from the other side to produce the finished hole(s) as shown in Photo 28. The final casting is shown against the original in Photo 29, all ready to be washed off in soapy water before gluing the top detail piece in place ready for the painting to begin.
Photo 30 shows my brand new collection of home made airbrushing supplies. We have a bottle of Flow Improver in the white top bottle composed of ¾ of a bottle of water (out of the tap down here, distilled if you’re in a hard water region) plus about ten drops of Glycerin. In the centre is my airbrush cleaner; 1/3 Isopropyl Alchohol, 2/3 water and a squirt of concentrated car windscreen wash (easy to tell apart with the blue tint from the windscreen wash) and in the dark blue topped bottle, my acrylic paint thinner: made up of 1/3 Isopropyl, 2/3 water plus ten drops of Glycerin again. All three liquids were made up in cleaned out meat paste jars, even this small quantity will last for months of airbrushing though you could make this up by the gallon if you needed to!
The difference these additives made was very noticeable – the fine spray of the black primer can be seen on the test paper shown in Photo 31. Instead of taking ages to build up the black as it did with the front wing, the hubs took just minutes to cover with light coats leaving a fine smooth finish as seen in Photos 32 and 33.
In the final installment of this ‘side project’, I’ll be completing the painting of the resin hubs (with a final change of plans along the way) and fitting the new parts into the spare tyres. Then, I can get back to the actual model again and move on to the first part of the disk brake (no resin required!)BigGrin
Until then, stay safe as always and Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Spare Wheel Hub Casting pic 4.JPG
Spare Wheel Hub Casting pic 5.JPG
Spare Wheel Hub Casting pic 6.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Markwarren
#36 Posted : 04 June 2021 13:44:28

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Just catching up with your build, some lovely work Robin.Love Drool

Mark
Plymouth57
#37 Posted : 09 June 2021 19:54:01

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Many thanks for that Mark, this is progressing well I'm glad to say!Cool

I would have to say though that alongside these additives to make the paint so much easier to airbrush shown in the previous installment, the other most useful addition is shown in Photo 34 – the screw on airbrush holder! This is so much easier than trying to hold the airbrush in one hand whilst adding more paint or propping it up against the compressor whilst making more paint or getting the cleaner out. I wish I’d got one of these ages ago!Blushing
Anyway, the greatly improved airbrushing continued with the gold and duraluminium paints as shown in Photos 35 and 36 with the kit original alongside. It was only when the original was compared to the airbrushed copy I realized that what I had taken for a gold finish was actually more of a brass one! Unfortunately the Metal Colour range doesn’t (yet) include a brass but Vallejo does have that colour in their smaller Model Air range (smaller bottle that is) so I’m just awaiting a delivery of that to see if the copies can be made closer to the kit parts – if not, I do actually like that gold effect and it does match up nicely with some of the bodywork frames shown in the Haynes Manual on the 312 so with a bit of ink washing on the details I’ll go with that.
Photo 37 was just a little experiment, using a spare hub I thought I’d see just what that Metal Colour would be like if airbrushed onto a raw resin casting without either soapy water washing or priming – as you can see – not bad covering power at all!Cool
A quick comparison of the kit colours and the resin copies is shown in Photo 38, the resin ones on the right, are finished in the Duraluminium on top and the Gold underneath. The difference in Photo 39 is hopefully more obvious, once the gold had been lightly over-sprayed with the Vallejo Model Air Brass, the difference between the resin copy hub and the metal kit part is negligible! Now that the colour was acceptable, the next stage was to pick out the details with a wash of Citadel Skaven Brown acrylic. This was used on both the ‘chrome’ hub in Photo 40 and the now Brass hub,(both sides on the larger brass one). Just before carrying on, Photo 41 shows the ‘upgrade’ to the height gauge I made to check the size of the triple layered resin hub. Using just the plasticard gauge on its own meant checking each time that I was actually holding it dead vertical – this little set up does that automatically. The gauge is liquid-poly glued to an offcut of Perspex with a couple of strengthening supports glued in as well. Now I just slowly push the hub stack through the hole, sanding down until it fits!
I also discovered a way to (almost) cut out one of the stages in casting the bigger hub! Photo 42 shows the piece of silicone that I originally thought was a piece of waste! This was stuck on the top of the mould and I actually had to pull it off in order to get the original kit metal hub back out of the mould. It never occurred to me that it might actually be a part of the mould though. The slightly redder parts are where I filled in two large air bubbles after trying a resin cast with the ‘top hat’ placed back in position as per Photo 43. The resulting casting is shown in Photo 44 and as you can see that stepped hole that I needed to drill out with the Forstner bit is faithfully reproduced (unfortunately along with a pair of ‘dimples’ caused by those air bubbles). During the ‘removal’ of those resin lumps I managed to once again prove the fact that human finger flesh is far easier to remove than cured resin – managed to keep the blood off the painted hubs though!BigGrin I subsequently rummaged through the Ferrari’s big box of bits and dug out the other front wheel hub set (I might as well paint up that one too whilst I’ve got the airbrush set up) and used the metal part to cast a little rubber plug to use for this area. Now I can fill up the mould until the resin just covers the top details as before, then fill up the central shaft and push the plug down inside. Once cured, remove the plug to find a perfect stepped shaft, which just requires the Forstner to be hand turned inside to clean up any defects – this cuts out the entire pillar drill task!Cool The final result of all this extra (but very interesting work) is shown in Photos 45 and 46. Two spare tyres turned into two spare wheels! And finally, since I’ve now got the other set of parts handy, Photos 47 and 48 illustrate the differences between the kit stock parts (on the right) against the re-painted kit parts on the left. Both the front spare wheels are shown in Photo 49 with the rear one still awaiting the painted on lettering. (Done now!)
In the next installment, an object lesson in reading the instructions properly when putting the kit wheels together!Blushing Until then, stay safe and Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Spare Wheel Hub Casting pic 7.JPG
Spare Wheel Hub Casting pic 8.JPG
Spare Wheel Hub Casting pic 9.JPG
Spare Wheel Hub Casting pic 10.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Markwarren
#38 Posted : 11 June 2021 08:29:14

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Very nice work Robin. Love Love Drool

Mark
roymattblack
#39 Posted : 11 June 2021 09:41:09

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Some great scratch-work there.
A pity a few more people don't give moulding/casting a try as I'm sure they would see it's not the 'black art' they imagine.

Keep it coming - fantastic stuff.Love
Plymouth57
#40 Posted : 13 June 2021 20:22:23

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Many thanks again to Mark and Roy, much appreciated as always!

You're spot on there Roy, mould making and casting in resin can seem a bit daunting at first but the technique opens up so many avenues in modelling and despite the initial costs can really save you a lot of money in the long term. Especially in producing spare parts as I did in this case and also in mass production of scratch built items too. Imagine scratch building a ship with 50 cannon - you only need to make one, mould it and cast the other 49 (or 50 and keep the first as a master!) I can really recommend anyone having a go - they'll love it!BigGrin

Ok then, with the resin-hub adapted spare wheels completed, I suppose I’d better actually build the kit ‘real wheels’! I’ve just completed the second one now, even though it comes further down in the instructions schedule (you make the entire left front wheel with its suspension, brakes and steering before going on to the right hand one). One word of warning for those also building this fantastic model – where the instructions say “couple the beadlock with the tyre” and “insert the wheel rim into the tyre until it connects with the ring” it should read “fight like hell to insert the beadlock and rim, keeping all skylights closed to avoid the temptation of throwing all your hard work out the window!” This is not as easy an operation as it seems in the build instruction photos.Blink Unfortunately I made one major mistake – I read the instructions – the wrong instructions!
Photo 1 illustrates the wheel components removed from the clear plastic tray they come in. It also contains the first parts of the disk brake as well but we’ll come to them next time. We have the rubber tyre with its foam plastic lining, the metal hub and plastic rim now repainted to match the others and a little bag with three Type A screws (only two required). To put the spare wheels together I duly read the instructions in Phase 3 of Pack 01 which stated as above, fitting in the plastic (or in my case resin) chrome Beadlock rim first. This went in fairly well after a bit of fiddling about to get the rubber tyre over the four flanges, followed by the larger metal (still resin) hub. This one was a little more difficult as with the chrome ring in place there isn’t so much ‘wriggle room’ to get the tyre rim around the moulded circumference of the hub. Eventually it did go together though and all looked fine (see the final photos in the last post). I then washed and re-painted the kit hub parts I’d used to produce the moulds from and following the same instructions tried to fit them into the wet weather tyre. Would it/they fit? Would they Hell!Cursing I tried everything from standing the tyre on the heat mat to standing it in a tray of hot water to try and soften the rubber, nothing worked. Then, when all else had failed I decided to read the instructions again – not the instructions for fitting the slicks on, but the instructions way down in Pack 12, almost right at the end of the build where it tells you how to remove the slick tyres and replace them with the wet ones (whilst also replacing the early hub caps with a set of nifty metal magnetic ones as well)!Cool I obviously didn’t need to go through the wheel removal bit with all the unscrewing that entails but I got to the unscrewing the two Type A screws joining the hub together, removing the hub pieces and then inserting them into the wet tyre. And guess what – a tyre is a tyre is a tyre? Not on this one it isn’t. To fit the slicks you put in the chrome hub followed by the metal hub – but on the wet weather tyres you have to fit the big metal hub first AND THEN fit the plastic chrome one! Those wet rubber tyres are definitely harder to flex than the slicks. I eventually managed to get the two hubs in place but even doing it the correct way round I still needed to employ one of my stainless steel sculpting tools (the one shaped a bit like a tyre lever ironically) to lever around the flanges to get the rubber over them. In the process I managed to rub off some of the Duraluminium from the outer rim of the chrome ring, something that didn’t happen on either of the resin hubs fitted into the slick tyres. You can’t just paint the Duraluminium back in unfortunately, as its an airbrush paint and too thin to cover. Instead I painted over the bright chrome with Mig Dull Aluminium and once dry painted over that with the Vallejo Metal Colour. Fortunately it looks fine after the touch up. The other thing I learned fitting the resin hubs into the spare wheels was to fit the hubs first and then paint the lettering on. Doing the lettering first meant that a few bits of it got rubbed off whilst manhandling the rims under the rubber! Again, a quick re-touch and all was good again.BigGrin
Oh, and I nearly forgot – the instructions don’t mention it at all which is surprising, but for complete accuracy before fitting the hubs in to the tyre check the direction of the arrow moulded on the tyre wall! With the arrow pointing left the chrome rim goes in the tyre, if the arrow points right it’s the metal brass one instead (this is for the left wheel which comes first in the instructions of course). Do it the wrong way round and your tyre is put on backwards! If anyone wonders why I didn’t paint an ‘RF’ on the other spare wheel – um, see above!Blushing
So, Photo 2 shows the metal hub being pushed down into the tyre followed by the plastic Beadlock on the other side in Photo 3. (See the moulded arrow down at 5 O’clock, this is the right hand wheel). The first wheel lined up perfectly for the screws, this one needed a little help to push the hubs around a bit to line up the holes. Once they were aligned two Type A screws were fitted in and screwed down to tighten the two hubs together as shown arrowed in Photo 4. The second wheel stripped even more of the paint off but again was fine after a double layered touch up.
And so, finally, we have the complete set of wheels; the two kit wheels at the front with their wet weather tyres on and the spare set with the Racing Slicks and resin cast hubs behind which will eventually form part of the ‘extras’ on the display base all shown in the last Photo 5.
In the next installment, beginning the primary stage of the first wheel’s disk brake mechanism.
Until then, stay safe and Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Left Front Wheel Assembly pic 1.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
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