Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics | Log In | Register

Thunderbird 2 customised build - page 1 Options
Tomick
#1 Posted : 25 July 2017 12:53:24

Rank: Pro

Groups:

Joined: 24/08/2009
Posts: 44,240
Points: -6,458
Thunderbird 2 holds the distinction of being the most frequently seen of all the Thunderbirds models, appearing in all but one episode of the TV series ("The Impostors") and also appearing in all three movies.

The Thunderbird 2 customised build is a tribute to a Thunderbirds icon!

Any questions on the Customised build should be posted into the Thunderbird 2 discussion topic.
http://forum.model-space...aspx?g=topics&f=496
roymattblack
#2 Posted : 04 September 2017 08:01:49

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourPublisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Registered, Moderator, Administrators, Global Forum Support

Joined: 04/06/2011
Posts: 2,799
Points: 8,552
Location: ipswich
5, 4, 3, 2, 1.... Thunderbird 2 is go.

Off we go.

The purpose of this build is to hopefully take the model and all of the rescue vehicles up a notch to create a model that is more like the studio props.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with the kit as it is and no doubt there will be many excellent builds on the forum over the coming weeks and months.
However, the models have masses of scope for extra detailing and this is what will be done here.

The build will not necessarily always be in the same order as the partwork suggests, as there will be times that certain sections are left until later for detailing and weathering purposes.

The main craft, Thunderbird 2 will eventually have all seams and joins rigidly glued, filled and smoothed so that the craft can receive a full repaint and weathering.
The pod interiors will also be weathered and details added based on genuine TV reference images.
Similarly, the rescue vehicles will be de-seamed, joins filled and repainted.
Details such as handrails will be attended to, as will any additional pipe work and cables etc.

Nothing that is done here should be beyond the skills of anyone. Fortunately, TB2 itself is sufficiently large as to make the work relatively easy.

Where possible, I will post links to genuine images for reference, which is allowable but for obvious copyright reasons, the images themselves cannot be posted here.

So - all aboard those who fancy 'upping the ante'.
Keep watching...any questions should be posted into the Thunderbird 2 discussion topic.

roymattblack
#3 Posted : 05 September 2017 10:55:00

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourPublisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Registered, Moderator, Administrators, Global Forum Support

Joined: 04/06/2011
Posts: 2,799
Points: 8,552
Location: ipswich
PACK 1

To begin with, the cockpit section has been glued into place so that when the craft is repainted in the future, the join line won’t be so apparent.
This is completely at your discretion.

The interior parts are also assembled and put to one side.
There is no need for pictures at this stage.

ELEVATOR CAR 1

The elevator car is assembled piece at a time as per the instructions but the roll bar over the cab is a bit too thick. This can be remade using a plastic covered paper clip.

Using the kit part as a template cut and bend a piece of paperclip to the same shape. Pictures 1, 2 and 3.

The cross-piece from the kit part should be carefully cut off and two small curves filed into the underside as shown in pictures 4, 5 and 6.

Using cyano adhesive, glue the new roll cage into the holes in the body. A paper clip fits perfectly.
Glue the cross piece into place as shown in picture 7.

The platform legs have mould seams on them and these should be carefully sanded off – picture 8.

Assemble the platform using clamps to keep everything flat. The kit upper platform part may have a slight warp so the clamps are necessary here. Picture 9.

Use Google here to find as many reference pictures of the elevator car as you can.

The entire model body can be repainted a satin/matt orange as the kit plastic isn’t quite the correct colour. The pictures make the finish look somewhat glossy but in reality, it is quite dull. Picture 10.

The platform can now be assembled after repainting the hydraulic legs silver.
Weathering should now be added using a thin wash of matt earth and white spirit. Dab the platform with a paper towel to remove brush marks and leave a mottled effect on the surface.
Add further washes of matt sand and matt earth along the edges of the platform and frame. Pictures 11 and 12.

Use a cut down brush and lightly dry-brush a diluted matt black on the body. Think about where the vehicle would get the dirtiest, and also use the effect to highlight raised parts. Always brush from front to back on the model to represent how dirt would actually hit a fast moving vehicle. Do not brush anywhere from side to side.

If you overdo any black, remove it with a cotton bud dipped in white spirit.
Further weathering using light tan or sand colour can be added. Do not forget the platform frame, particularly at the front. Pictures 13 and 14.

The tyres should be painted using a light tan/sand colour, diluted with white spirit.
Brush well into the treads and sidewalls and remove the excess by ‘rolling’ the wheels in a paper towel. Picture 15.

Note that the rear axle parts next to the body should be painted silver – Picture 17.

The platform can now be fitted and any further detail painting or weathering added.
Pictures 16, 17, 18 and 19.

The weathering may look quite overdone in the pictures – an unfortunate effect of close up photography of a small model. In fact, the weathering – particularly the tyres, is quite light.
However, if you look at any genuine pictures of the vehicles in Thunderbirds you will see that they are all extremely heavily weathered to make them look less like models.


roymattblack attached the following image(s):
1.JPG
2.JPG
3.JPG
4.JPG
5.JPG
6.JPG
7.JPG
8.JPG
9.JPG
10.JPG
11.JPG
12.JPG
13.JPG
14.JPG
15.JPG
16.JPG
17.JPG
18.JPG
19.JPG
19b.jpg
roymattblack
#4 Posted : 05 September 2017 16:30:19

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourPublisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Registered, Moderator, Administrators, Global Forum Support

Joined: 04/06/2011
Posts: 2,799
Points: 8,552
Location: ipswich
COCKPIT AND LOWER NOSE SECTION

These parts can be assembled as per the instructions. There is no additional detail needed although to prevent any light seepage from the cockpit lighting through the canopy edges, adhesive aluminium tape can be cut and fitted around the joins as shown in picture 1.

If the canopy is to be left removable this is not necessary.
Fit the other internal parts as per the instructions. Picture 2.

THUNDERBIRD 4

Assembly of Thunderbird 4 is very straightforward although it has been noted in some builds that the finished vehicle is quite light. This can be helped by filling the rear voids with plasticine before assembly as in picture 3.
Take care not to fill any locating holes.
Thunderbird 4 can then be lightly weathered.

There are numerous pictures of TB4 on the web but many are models that are not part of the original TV series. Many of these models are heavily weathered which is actually silly as TB4 spent its working life under water! It would hardly become filthy.

If you look at genuine pictures from the TV series you will see that it is actually quite clean with only light shading on a few panels.
This can be achieved by using thin strips of masking tape fixed to the body IN FRONT of the planned shading.

Use a soft pencil and lightly ‘scribble’ a patch next to the tape. Try not to leave any hard lines.
With a cotton bud, gently smudge the pencil, dragging towards the rear of the craft.
Remove the tape and work on a different panel. Try not to go too far.
The pencil can be sealed with a matt spray – not brush.

In fact, if the model is handled carefully there is no need to seal the pencil.
The majority of weathering on the original studio props was done in this way.
roymattblack attached the following image(s):
1.JPG
2.JPG
3.JPG
4.JPG
5.JPG
6.JPG
Users browsing this topic
Guest
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Powered by YAF | YAF © 2003-2009, Yet Another Forum.NET
This page was generated in 0.308 seconds.
DeAgostini