Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics | Log In | Register

4 Pages <1234>
Sword Beach D-Day Landings Options
roymattblack
#41 Posted : 13 June 2019 16:37:48

Rank: Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourPublisher Medal: Article published MedalActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Registered, Moderator, Administrators, Global Forum Support

Joined: 04/06/2011
Posts: 2,325
Points: 7,101
Location: ipswich
Hello there Robin.
I think the picture was taken at combined ops in Largs, Scotland.
My dad was on HMS Gleaner, shadowing the Bismark leading to it's destruction.
He was in the fray on D day and then in a survivors camp at Sur De Mer.

He still tells us some hilarious tales - not everything was grim.

One such tale, he and a shipmate were ordered to swab the deck of their ship as a punishment for something or other. (Jankers, it was called)
They decided to speed things up by using a massive hose to wash the deck.
Unfortunately, they didn't check all the hatches were shut...

They flooded the engine room and blew up several generators.

Oh dear.
Kev the Modeller
#42 Posted : 15 June 2019 19:44:40

Rank: Vice-Master


Groups: Registered

Joined: 25/11/2018
Posts: 567
Points: 1,728
Location: Southeast UK
Nice work on those cast resin buildings Robin and a novel way of making the tank tracks in the sand, what a brilliant tool, hope it works very well for you.

I love such innovation in modelling, well done.Cool ThumpUp


@ Roy - Nice photo of your dad Roy, having watched some of your guitar videos I can see your features in him. A great story too, thanks or sharing! Cool

Kev Smile
Per Ardua Ad Astra
Plymouth57
#43 Posted : 15 June 2019 21:26:52

Rank: Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 1,717
Points: 5,161
Location: Plympton
Many thanks again to Roy, Tony and Kev! That's a great story Roy! I think I might have tried a "Blimey Capt! Did you see the size of that ruddy wave that just went past!"BigGrin My own Dad was disabled with a metal pin through his hip, the result of TB contracted after falling into a pig vat in his early teens. He served in the Plympton Home Guard through the war and along with his future father in law (who served in the Devonshire Regt through WW1) was the best shot in the platoon (his step father was a Royal Marine who taught small arms firing in the Devonport barracks and he regularly sneaked Dad in to shoot Lee Enfields on the range)Blink
After a night blitz on the rail yards his section was ordered to dig out twenty or so HE bombs that missed the railway and landed in the river Plym which is a tidal mud flat at low tide. The more they tried to dig them out the further down they slipped. In the end the UXB men said 'forget it'! They're still down there to this day!BigGrin
Onwards! As you’ve seen, the walls and road surface are created from the embossed styrene sheet, and to differentiate between those surfaces and the pavements I needed to have another size of block work or in this case paving slabs. There’s probably a perfectly sized embossed sheet out there, but since I only need a small amount I decided to make my own as shown in Photo 23. The blade in the foreground is the Olfa scribing cutter which is normally used for cutting sheets of 2mm Perspex, here it it used to lightly scribe over the thin plasticard sheet in parallel rows at right angles to create the slabs. Later on I’ll be adding a bit of surface debris around the damaged sea wall and the road craters and Photo 24 shows a section of the block embossed sheet in front of the safety razor blade used to slit it along the ‘courses’ of the blocks. When the debris is required I’ll use the same blade to slice off the individual blocks from the strips and liquid poly glue them onto the ground-work. Photos 25 and 26 illustrate the pavements in place, 25 shows where the two shops will be located (note the crater in the road, later to be deepened and ‘detailed’) and 26 shows the wall running along the front of the larger hotel. There may well be some more shell damage to add here later! Photo 27 shows the two shop buildings in place, the larger double fronted one on the right was composed of two identical houses which were glued together after sanding off the roof overhangs and moulded windows and door on the two walls where they join. Once the resin copies were glued together and set I then added the shop front boards and a roll up blind before hacking away with the rotary grinder. The black oval marks where another crater went in soon after!
The two civilian houses are shown in Photo 28, this was taken before the pavement was added on, and before the hotel garden wall as well. In Photo 29, the position of the house has been pencilled in and a thin plasticard ‘foundation’ cut to match the bottom of the building was temporarily fixed in place with a couple of spots of Deluxe Card Glue. Another strip of plasticard has been glued down to create the garden path leading up to the front door. I then ground down a section of the stone wall to represent a shell hit from the naval bombardment and then applied a thin skin of the Modelling Paste to create the ground level. This can be seen in Photo 30 after a stiff paintbrush was used to stipple the paste to make the ‘grass’ surface before digging a section up again to make the shell crater. The ‘sausage’ applied around the inside of the wall (after the paste had dried) is white Superfine Milliput Epoxy Putty. This was then sculpted with a large sewing needle, basically by ‘stabbing’ at it over and over, gradually creating the ‘garden hedge’ effect as shown in Photos 31 and 32. Note the ‘blown in’ effect behind the shattered wall and the ‘blown out’ section forced out over the stone wall by the shell blast. I’ve also added a little more paste behind the crater and later on I’ll add a few bricks to the garden and some on the road outside. Finally in Photo 33 we have the house fitted into the garden. The foundation piece was carefully removed creating a location point for the house to sit in. I now have to make a silicone mould to cast the house in resin and then give that copy the shell shock treatment before making a second mould to cast the finished article. More on that next time!

Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
The Base pic 7.JPG
The Base pic 8.JPG
The Base pic 9.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
birdaj2
#44 Posted : 15 June 2019 21:35:42

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contribution
Groups: Registered

Joined: 31/05/2010
Posts: 4,835
Points: 14,557
Location: Wiltshire
Robin

Really impressive how you have created that cobbled road effect in such a small scale.

It all looks so good. Looking forward to seeing some paint on those houses and gardens - its going to look really fine that is for sure.

Tony
Happy Modelling

Project: USS Constitution - subscription complete.
Project: Porsche 911 - subscribed to the 24 month option. Project: Jaguar - E type
Project: Harley Davidson Fat boy. Project: Lam. Countach
Project: 1:200 Bismarck (hachette).
nightwisher
#45 Posted : 15 June 2019 22:31:43

Rank: Vice-Master
Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contribution
Groups: Registered

Joined: 09/12/2013
Posts: 502
Points: 1,537
Location: smethwick england
Wow fantastic detail for such a small scale Love
Current builds-deagostini sovereign of the seas. Finished builds-eaglemoss endeavour,A.L Santa maria,A.L mare nostrum.
Markwarren
#46 Posted : 16 June 2019 09:22:28

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourPublisher Medal: Article published MedalActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Administrators, Global Forum Support, Registered, Moderator, Official Builds

Joined: 04/01/2016
Posts: 4,279
Points: 13,124
Location: Northamptonshire, England
Lovely work Robin. Just catching up on your build. Love Love

Mark
Plymouth57
#47 Posted : 01 July 2019 21:34:03

Rank: Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 1,717
Points: 5,161
Location: Plympton
Grateful thanks again to Tony, Nightwisher and Mark! I'm almost looking forward to the painting Tony (almost!)BigGrin Some more groundwork to finish yet though, and then joining the beach to the wall! Anyway, here's the first 'civvie' house completed!...

Photo 34 illustrates the full process in adapting the Skywave house to the shell battered Normandy version. On the left is the first casting made from the Skywave original via the initial silicone mould. The slight overhang of the roof edge on the right was filed away at the ridge to allow a new chimney stack from plastic square section to be added and topped off with a chimney pot from plastic rod. A new silicone mould was created for this version and a second resin casting produced which is pictured in the centre. This one then had a plastic rod drainpipe added (which should have gone on the first one but I forgot!Blushing ) and was then attacked with the rotary tool equipped with a very thin diamond dust engraving bit. As you can see I took some chunks out of the walls (and also from the sides of the chimney stack which are hidden here) and removed some tiles from the roof along with some hollowed out windows and a dormer to simulate shattered window glass. When the damage looked about right, I then made a final third silicone mould to cast the finished building, the casting of the finished article is shown on the right.
Photos 35 and 36 show the earlier shop buildings in close up and also the ‘enhanced’ craters in the road now equipped with the individual cobble stones and paving slabs thrown up by the explosions. Note the shell hole on the pavement between the shops – that’s the one shown by the black oval in the earlier installment! There’s a few more blocks gone in since these pics were taken but I have to be careful not to stick them everywhere (even though that would be more realistic) otherwise they’ll stop the tanks from sitting flat on the road!Blink
At the moment I’m trying to model a 1/700th greenhouse to place in one of the gardens. My original bottle of clear resin obviously didn’t appreciate the temperature up in the attic and is now more treacle than water so I’m awaiting a new, hopefully better type of clear – the new one says faster cure and ‘no stickiness’ which would be very welcome!
Until that arrives, the next installment will be the final part of the invasion fleet – the tiny LCA or Landing Craft Assault – a whole one inch of fiddly re-engineering!Crying
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
The Base pic 10.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
roymattblack
#48 Posted : 01 July 2019 21:55:25

Rank: Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourPublisher Medal: Article published MedalActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Registered, Moderator, Administrators, Global Forum Support

Joined: 04/06/2011
Posts: 2,325
Points: 7,101
Location: ipswich
I'm sure you've seen this, but I just bought it for my Dad (94) as he was there...

https://www.amazon.co.uk...mp;s=gateway&sr=8-1

Amazing book. Incredible history.
Plymouth57
#49 Posted : 01 July 2019 22:13:30

Rank: Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 1,717
Points: 5,161
Location: Plympton
Hi Roy!

No, I hadn't seen that one!Cursing It looks a really good read too! At the moment I've been reading the "D-Day Remembered" IWM book by Richard Holmes and the Anthony Beevor "D-Day, the Battle for Normandy" which is purely text apart from a few pages of photos. It's well worth reading though, just for the horrible mistakes that happened throughout the campaign - eg, US 8th Air force is instructed to bomb ahead of the Canadians - Canadians use yellow smoke grenades to show their positions, and the US bombers are ordered to use yellow smoke markers to indicate the targets! The Richard Holmes book is currently in 'The Works' discount store at £10!
Give my best to your Dad - and all our thanks too!

Robin.
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Gandale
#50 Posted : 01 July 2019 22:42:45

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourPublisher Medal: Article published MedalActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Administrators, Registered, Global Forum Support, Moderator, Official Builds, Administrator

Joined: 08/09/2012
Posts: 13,860
Points: 42,379
Location: Aberdeen
Really impressive work Robin, your eye for detail is incredible....Drool Drool

Regards

Alan
Markwarren
#51 Posted : 02 July 2019 07:07:48

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourPublisher Medal: Article published MedalActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Administrators, Global Forum Support, Registered, Moderator, Official Builds

Joined: 04/01/2016
Posts: 4,279
Points: 13,124
Location: Northamptonshire, England
Great work Robin, working that small is going to take some painting and sore eyes.LOL

Mark
birdaj2
#52 Posted : 02 July 2019 08:56:37

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contribution
Groups: Registered

Joined: 31/05/2010
Posts: 4,835
Points: 14,557
Location: Wiltshire
Coming together so well and you attention and understanding (more importantly) of just what details to add and how to add them is very impressive.

Everything on this one looks just so right.

Hope it all continues well.

Tony
Happy Modelling

Project: USS Constitution - subscription complete.
Project: Porsche 911 - subscribed to the 24 month option. Project: Jaguar - E type
Project: Harley Davidson Fat boy. Project: Lam. Countach
Project: 1:200 Bismarck (hachette).
Plymouth57
#53 Posted : 07 July 2019 15:38:39

Rank: Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 1,717
Points: 5,161
Location: Plympton
Grateful thanks as always to Alan, Mark and Tony!Blushing Have to admit, this scale is pushing my eyes to the limit, thank goodness I've built up a sizable collection of magnifiers over the years!BigGrin

In this installment we have the last of the 'floating' items: the British Landing Craft Assault...
Photos 1 to 3 show the actual British Landing Craft Assault in action. The design of the British craft began early in the war and was the result of a choice between two competing designs. Of the two designs, this one was constructed of marine plywood for the most part with an external skin of armour plating. The other design was constructed entirely in metal and that was the main reason it lost the selection process. Long before the needs of D-Day, the LCA was designed primarily to ferry Commandos on raids into German occupied coasts. One of the requirements therefore was ‘stealth’. With the engine encased in a wooden superstructure the LCA is actually silent to a listener over 25 yards away! On the other hand, the all-metal competitor, although it handled perfectly well, sounded like a tank struggling up a steep hill from a hundred yards away!Blink
You are all probably familiar with the scene in Saving Private Ryan where the American landing craft hit the shore, the ramp drops down and all hell breaks loose! The British version was actually better for beach assaults and in fact, the US troops preferred to be taken ashore by the RN where possible, Photo 1 was taken a couple of days after D-Day and shows American re-enforcements doing just that! In the American design, the landing craft is capable of transporting small vehicles as well as troops, hence the large front ramp and the crew positions at the stern. The British LCA is purely a troop carrier however and unlike the American craft where the infantry have to stand up, the troops are sat down on three benches, one down the centre and one on each side under an overhang, which provides shelter from small arms fire. The sitting arrangement is shown in Photo 2. Additionally, the crew consisting of the cox’n (driver) and a Lewis gunner are positioned at the front in a pair of armoured ‘boxes’. The bow ramp is smaller than the American and between the two crew positions is a second internal armoured door which was only opened after the ramp was down (and any MG42 which might have opened up when the ramp went down had run out of ammo!) Photo 3 was taken during the British landings and you can see the smaller ramp in the water and just to the left of the Lewis gun firing port you can make out the top of the inner door opened out flat against the hull. (All three photos courtesy of Wikipedia). Photo 4 shows two of the US style landing craft, which come with the Skywave Beach head vehicles set which will be forming the basis for the conversion. The two holes at the stern are supposed to be for a pair of guns (50 cals I think) but the LCA has a couple of either air intakes or exhausts, not sure which, in that position so I can leave them there!
Diagram 5 illustrates the conversion process on the kit parts. I first made up a silicone mould to cast the American craft ‘as is’. Once I had produced a resin version I then sliced off the angled bow where the ramp should attach on one of the kit originals and, using a resin copy, sliced off a section of the bow with the angled front intact and glued it onto the kit hull, lengthening the craft to the British dimensions. (This is all a lot clearer in Photo 6, which shows the conversion in its entirety). I then added a thin sliver of plasticard to the centre of the floor to form the lower part of the centre bench followed by another sliver on top to extend the bench to the aft bulkhead. The two armoured crew cockpits were also made in two parts – a lower half up to the top of the hull sides and a top piece which extends out to the extreme edge of the hull (note that the ‘driver’s cockpit is rectangular but the gunner’s position is wedge shaped!) At the rear of the deck a little winch was made up from styrene rod, this would be attached to a kedge anchor and dropped when approaching a shallow beach to enable the LCA to drag itself back off the beach for the return to the troop ship. Finally, the angled sides of the kit ramp were cut off and glued to the front of the hull and plasticard strips were used to make the tiny inner armoured doors (but not glued in just yet). The reason that the inner doors and ramp weren’t attached was that I now made a quick silicone mould of the LCA as it was, and cast two resin copies. One of these had the ramp attached in the ‘up’ position and a single plasticard strip with a groove cut down the centre was glued in to represent the inner doors closed up. The second resin copy had its bow ramp glued in the down position and two little plasticard doors added opened up. With the two variants completed I could then make a second, larger mould to cast one of each at the same time.
The sequence of painting from start to finish is shown in Photo 7. From bottom left we have the bare resin casting, about half a dozen of these were temporarily glued to a coffee stirrer with a drop of the Deluxe Card Glue and once fixed, were primed by brush with Vallejo Grey Primer as shown by the centre example. (A very useful tip here – Mum is prescribed eye drops, which come in a dinky little plastic bottle. Once the bottle is empty I pulled the dropper nozzle off and washed the bottle and nozzle out. I then filled it up with well shaken, Vallejo Grey Primer and pushed the nozzle back on – I now have a nice little air tight primer dispenser which saves having to take it out of the big Vallejo bottle each time!Cool I must put a label on it though, just in case!) On the bottom right is the next coat, Vallejo Sky Grey 70.989 with a light wash of Citadel Skaven Brown Ink. In the top row the first two on the left have had a dry brush of lightened Sky Grey to pick out the highlights and the rim of the troop compartment painted with Vallejo Ivory with Mig Satin Black for the centre of the winch. Finally, satin black was carefully painted over the ivory to create a black and white stripe effect, which many of the LCAs seem to have had. Tiny little black stripes were painted on the inner doors and the cockpits for the view slots. So that’s the dinky little LCAs – as you can see in the final Photo 8, there’s a few more to go yet! Some will be beached, some going in and out and maybe a couple with air bubbles will be ‘going down’!
In the next installment, it’s back to the houses again!

Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
LCA pic 1.JPG
LCA pic 2.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Markwarren
#54 Posted : 07 July 2019 21:02:58

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourPublisher Medal: Article published MedalActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Administrators, Global Forum Support, Registered, Moderator, Official Builds

Joined: 04/01/2016
Posts: 4,279
Points: 13,124
Location: Northamptonshire, England
Lovely work RobinLove , You do no that all that work on such a small scale will send you blind after a while.LOL

Coming alond great.

Mark
Kev the Modeller
#55 Posted : 08 July 2019 20:44:25

Rank: Vice-Master


Groups: Registered

Joined: 25/11/2018
Posts: 567
Points: 1,728
Location: Southeast UK
Another great update Robin, nice work on the conversions and looking like it's going to be an amazing diorama with lots going on wherever you look.

Can't wait to see the end result! Drool ThumpUp

Kev Smile
Per Ardua Ad Astra
Plymouth57
#56 Posted : 18 July 2019 15:56:57

Rank: Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 1,717
Points: 5,161
Location: Plympton
Grateful thanks again to Mark and Kev! I was going to type a witty response to Mark but I couldn't seem to focus on the ruddy keyboard!LOL
In this installment, a little addition to the second garden!...

Photo 1 shows the first stage of preparing the second house and garden. The previously scribed plasticard pavement left-overs have been trimmed to provide a small path around the base of the second house. In Photo 2 the DecoArt Modelling Paste has been used to create a grass lawn complete with another crater, this was the same method as the first house with the paste applied with a metal spatula and then stippled with a small stiff brush. The part on the left was done ‘freehand’ and I then had to carefully scrape away the paste where it spread over the pathway. Then I decided to do the right hand side properly and put strips of masking tape down first – much easier!Blushing You’ll notice on the left of the garden there is a rectangular plate in the grass. I was thinking of putting a small garden shed in there at first, but when I was cutting out the path from the plasticard sheet I suddenly got a new idea from the ‘grid’ scribed into the sheet – how about a greenhouse!Blink
Diagram 3 illustrates the basic design of the tiny (about an inch long) horticultural item. I first made up a plasticard core in the shape of the greenhouse and the parts shown here were then glued to the outside as a veneer. The white parts forming the glass walls and roof are constructed from the scribed paving slab sheet, the orangey section is from the sea wall/road surface embossed sheet to represent a brick base and the beige coloured part is from home cast resin (as you’ll see next). I wanted to model a door at each end and the simplest way to do that was to use the DWR Roto Resin to create a couple of hollow cast houses from the existing moulds as shown in Photo 4 (this would be a great method of creating badly damaged buildings too!) Using these I was able to then cut away the door section and use that to stick on to the end of the greenhouse as shown in Photo 5. Here the sections have been glued on and are setting hard before I then trim them back to the size of the building itself. The trimmed greenhouse, minus a little sanding down on its base is shown alongside the donor house with its door removed in Photo 6. Photo 7 shows the finished plasticard prototype, the roof ridge was made from the end of the scribed paving stone sheet which I’d hoped might create a ‘dogtooth’ finial effect – it actually looked quite good until I glued it in place at which point the liquid poly melted off most of the ‘teeth’!Crying
I then made a small silicone rubber mould of the prototype and sent off for a bottle of water clear resin (my old one, bought for the Sopwith Pup build has suffered two summers, including a heatwave up in the attic workroom and, although it still actually works is now more like treacle than water, which won’t take up the fine detail!) The new one is actually better – they’ve got over the problem the first one had which was if the surface of the mould wasn’t encased in silicone (ie, open topped), the resin exposed to the air wouldn’t set dry – it remained sticky or tacky to the touch. The new version goes solid all over, air or no air. Whilst I was waiting for the resin to arrive I tried a trial cast of the top half of the greenhouse roof using Poundshop Epoxy Glue instead, (having tried a trial-trial with a blob of epoxy on the outside of an old mould – it came away perfectly.Cool ) It didn’t look bad, so as soon as the resin arrived I cast a resin version. This is when another ‘What if’ idea popped up. Rather than simply casting a clear resin greenhouse, ‘what if’ I could get some greenery inside! The eventual solution is shown in Diagram 8. After filling the mould to the brim with the clear resin I sprinkled a layer of Woodland Scenics ‘Green Grass Fine Turf’ over the top and then carefully poked down into the resin through the turf with a cocktail stick, pushing some of the grass particles into the resin. I say the eventual solution because the first attempt used Woodland Scenics Course Turf instead, the results of which are shown in Photo 9 – it worked, but was more of a tropical snake house than a greenhouse! Photo 10 shows the more ‘restrained’ effect with the fine turf instead which is more proportional! Finally in Photo 11 we have the finished, painted greenhouse. The brick base was undercoated with Vallejo Grey Primer and then Mig Matt White, allowing the white to fill in the join between the brick and glass to create the bottom wooden frame. I then used the Mig White to paint the end frames and the door frame, before then painting the brick with Vallejo Red Leather. When dry, the bricks were washed with thinned Citadel Skaven Brown Ink and finally drybrushed with Vallejo Brown Rose. I then used the white again, thinned down to a wash and carefully applied it with a thin pointed brush, allowing it to flow into the depressions in the clear resin to create the wooden frames for the glass panes. The last job was to paint the roof ridge with normal consistency Mig Matt White.
All in all I’m really pleased with this little item – despite the one glaring fault – with all the close shelling there shouldn’t be a pane of glass left in it! Just as a further experiment, I’m going to cast a greenhouse in normal resin just so I can ground the heck out of it with the rotary, trying to router out many of the panes before making another little mould to cast that in clear. I have a feeling that it won’t look like broken panes though, casting ‘missing panes’ in clear will more likely create a multi-prism effect but it’ll be interesting to see what happens!BigGrin
In the next installment, moving on to house number two.

Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
The Base pic 11.JPG
The Base pic 12.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
birdaj2
#57 Posted : 18 July 2019 20:13:39

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contribution
Groups: Registered

Joined: 31/05/2010
Posts: 4,835
Points: 14,557
Location: Wiltshire
Robin

Hope all is well.

What can you say to this post ? A sub miniature greenhouse - wow - now that really is something different and looks just what it should look like.

You are so skilled and so impressed with the details you pack into such small items.

Tony
Happy Modelling

Project: USS Constitution - subscription complete.
Project: Porsche 911 - subscribed to the 24 month option. Project: Jaguar - E type
Project: Harley Davidson Fat boy. Project: Lam. Countach
Project: 1:200 Bismarck (hachette).
Martyn Ingram
#58 Posted : 18 July 2019 20:17:57

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourPublisher Medal: Article published MedalActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Registered

Joined: 17/02/2013
Posts: 3,142
Points: 9,497
Location: suffolk
BigGrin Lovely work Robin Cool
Martyn
Building Deag Vasa
Completed. Soliei Royal . Sovereign of the Seas . Virginia . Scotland . San Felipe . Corel vasa , Santisima Trinadad X section
Next Build Drago ?
When sailors have good wine, They think themselves in heaven for the time. John Baltharpe
Markwarren
#59 Posted : 18 July 2019 20:34:40

Rank: Super-Elite

Build-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourPublisher Medal: Article published MedalActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding build
Groups: Administrators, Global Forum Support, Registered, Moderator, Official Builds

Joined: 04/01/2016
Posts: 4,279
Points: 13,124
Location: Northamptonshire, England
Lovely work as usual Robin, such skill. That greenhouse just looks fantastic.Love Love Drool Drool

Mark
Kev the Modeller
#60 Posted : 19 July 2019 11:31:03

Rank: Vice-Master


Groups: Registered

Joined: 25/11/2018
Posts: 567
Points: 1,728
Location: Southeast UK
Superb work and amazing ingenuity as always from you Robin. Love the way you've come up with that greenhouse, brilliant stuff! Cool ThumpUp

My only criticism is that you forgot to add some .20 thou diameter tomatoes to those plants! Glare Flapper BigGrin

Kev Smile
Per Ardua Ad Astra
Users browsing this topic
Guest
4 Pages <1234>
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Powered by YAF | YAF © 2003-2009, Yet Another Forum.NET
This page was generated in 0.283 seconds.
DeAgostini