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Santìsima Trinidad by Jack.Aubrey - De Agostini - Scale 1:90 - Full Model Options
jack.aubrey
#121 Posted : 18 January 2015 18:03:30

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ian smith wrote:
Hi Jack.
Realy stunning Build. Look forward to seeing More IanCool Cool BigGrin

I like very much your comment, Ian. Cheers Jack.


Posted: Wed Apr 16, 2008

The installation of the guns - Forecastle

The next three images show the forecastle after the installation of the eight guns.

As you can see the breeching tackle is in place and I also have tried to simulate some kind of train tackle.

This last particular is not completely 100% a right train tackle because it was for me impossible to find blocks small enough to fit the right scale and I have consequently used only ropes. So, don't shot me for this non conformace to the reality. Anyway I believe it's better this solution than nothing . .

To keep in the right place/shape the breeching tackle I have used diluted vinylic glue applied on the rope. Once dry this maintains the given shape.

Please note also the bellfry, the bell and the galley chimney.

See you soon. Jack.Aubrey
jack.aubrey attached the following image(s):
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jack.aubrey
#122 Posted : 20 January 2015 09:30:55

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Posted: Thu Apr 17, 2008

The installation of the guns - Quarterdeck

These two images show the installation of 10 guns in the quarterdeck. The work is not yet completed in the right side of the images.

Same processes and techniques used for the forecastle, nothing more, nothing less, only the guns are different.

Regards. Jack.Aubrey
jack.aubrey attached the following image(s):
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jack.aubrey
#123 Posted : 21 January 2015 19:13:39

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Posted: Fri Apr 18, 2008

I have here the last two photos detailing the forecastle and the head.
Regards. Jack.Aubrey
jack.aubrey attached the following image(s):
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jack.aubrey
#124 Posted : 27 January 2015 18:04:34

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Posted: Fri Apr 18, 2008

In addition to ship modeling, where I normally eat a lot of wood and glue, I'm also a great paper eater. I like very much history (in general) and in these latest times history about the sailship history.

I have recently read the book here below depicted and I found it very interesting to understand that particular history (at a relative cheap cost).

What follows is taken from a book abstract on the internet.

NAM Rodger’s The Command of the Ocean, the second part of his naval history trilogy that began with The Safeguard of the Sea, describes Britain’s rise to naval greatness during the period 1649-1815 when she finally gained sovereignty of the seas around the British Isles.
It ably demonstrates the importance of naval history to the life of government and the nation; links naval history with political, social, economic, diplomatic, administrative, medical and religious history and charts the naval histories of Britain’s enemies and neighbors including France, Holland, Spain, Denmark and the United States.

Have no doubt, this is a brilliant piece of scholarship, cleverly organized and wonderfully written. Given the promising subject matter of naval warfare to work with it is not surprising that an historian with literary flair can produce a gripping narrative.
Perhaps what is surprising is that half the book is devoted to the seemingly mundane background of naval history--how the Navy was managed, financed, directed, and supplied with materials, how the men were fed and so on--rather than the showy foreground, yet it remains a deeply engrossing read throughout.
The secret of Rodger’s success is not just down to the cracking narrative and fine scholarship but partly to the way he has organized his material. The main body of the book is arranged into four parallel streams: policy, strategy and naval operations; finance, administration and logistics; social history; and finally the tools of sea-power, ships and weapons.

These four themes are broken up into thirty six relatively small chapters each covering a certain time span.

Constructing the book in this way has certain practical advantages for the reader. Most importantly, separating the key themes and alternating between them keeps the narrative fresh and interesting while giving the reader the best chance of taking on board the who, what, where, when, how and why of things without losing either the sense of continuity or one’s bearings.
Over 100 pages of information are left outside the main body of the text: the front of the book contains several maps, a useful chart listing dates, battles and the names of the ships involved while the back contains an English glossary, a general chronology and appendixes on ships, fleets, rates of pay, Admirals and officials, manpower and naval finance. Rodger’s choice of structure along with his great story-telling abilities means we can assimilate the maximum amount of information with a minimal degree of effort while being thoroughly entertained along the way. On the whole The Command of the Ocean is one those rare specimens that will simultaneously stimulate the specialist and greatly please the general reader.

To conclude: a very (for me) interesting book with a lot of informations shown in tables and maps that help very much and can be used as reference when necessary. Jack.
jack.aubrey attached the following image(s):
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jack.aubrey
#125 Posted : 28 January 2015 19:55:38

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Posted: Fri Apr 18, 2008

When I discovered that "The Command of the Ocean" was only a part of a trilogy it was practically automatic to plan the next book in one of the remaining. So, having terminated the reading of the first I'm now reading the second. To be honest this book should be read before the other but I didn't now that.

This is the history of the roman and middle age naval fact of Britain and its content is practically totally unknown in details to a non-specialized reader.

Throughout Britain's history, one factor above all others has determined the fate of the nation: its navy. N. A. M. Rodger's definitive account reveals how the political and social progress of Britain has been inextricably intertwined with the strength - and weakness - of its sea power, from the desperate early campaigns against the Vikings to the defeat of the great Spanish Armada. Covering policy, strategy, ships, recruitment and weapons, this is a superb tapestry of nearly 1,000 years of maritime history. No other historian has examined the subject in anything like the detail found here. The result is an outstanding example of narrative history.

Does anyone know the title of the third book of this trilogy ?
jack.aubrey attached the following image(s):
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jack.aubrey
#126 Posted : 14 February 2015 14:57:56

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Posted: Sun Apr 20, 2008

Yesterday, Saturday, I resumed the work on the Santìsima Trinidad. But it was a day where my brain was creative so I didn't follow any established plan or instruction and I "literally" invented what you can see in the next three images.

Everything started from the observation that the poop deck, looking aft, was quite empty so I remembered a photo seen on "the 100-gun ship Victory" of the Anatomy of the Ship series where in the same area are depicted the compartmented flag lockers and I decided to build them.

More or less two hours of work but I am really satisfied. I have used recycled materials, so no additional cost on the budget. It should also be possible to add another small but interesting detail: the canvas shrouds, obviously pulled back.

See you soon, Jack.Aubrey
jack.aubrey attached the following image(s):
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jack.aubrey
#127 Posted : 16 February 2015 13:02:05

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Posted: Mon Apr 21, 2008

Another small detail I have "creatively" added to the head: something callable "bowsprit bitt", made up of two bitt pins and the cross piece. I decided to apply this detail in this area in order to have something that could better strengthen the structure.
jack.aubrey attached the following image(s):
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