Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics | Log In | Register

Official HMS Victory Cross Section Build Diary - Issues 126 -130 Options
admin
#1 Posted : 29 August 2012 18:00:33
Rank: Administration


Groups: Administrator, Administrators

Joined: 24/08/2009
Posts: 971
Points: 3,054
BigGrin
Mark Adams
Tomick
#2 Posted : 29 August 2012 18:37:11

Rank: Pro

Groups:

Joined: 24/08/2009
Posts: 23,601
Points: -6,208
Issue 126 - Contains wood strips, assorted threads, buckets & small barrels, mast step parts & platform frame parts, and the stub mast dowel., and has instructions to extend the planking up the rib frames.

This time, start by continuing to plank the outside of the hull. You need to leave gaps for the gunports and entry ports, which are deliberately made undersized. (They will be cut to size later, with the aid of a template to be provided).

Planking the hull - You will need the 2 x 5mm planks supplied in issues 124 and 125. The following steps only describe one side of the model.

Cut a 46mm length of 2 x 5mm wood and glue it in place so that it overhangs the edge of rib 4 by about 1mm.
Hold the piece of planking in place using map pins while the glue dries.

Add another strip the same size above it, aligning the ends of the two.

Cut two 10mm strips and glue them so that they overhang rib 2 by about 1mm. The gap in the planking forms the beginnings of a gun port.
When you plank the other side of the hull, these strips must still be fixed to frame 2, so the planking is a mirror image of this.

Repeat this with two 13mm strips glued so that they overhang rib 8 by about 1mm.

Add three 94mm strips, making sure that the top one overlaps the top of ribs 5 and 6. This forms the bottom of the entry port opening.

Add strips of wood, each 43mm long and overhanging rib 2, until the top strip is just below the ends of ribs 5c and 6c. The example shown in the magazine step needed  5 strips, but depending on the spacing, you may only need four.

Add another four or  five strips, 41mm long and overhanging rib 8. Ensure that the strips are level at the top, trimming the last strip if necessary.

Add another three or four strips, 94mm long, until the top strip just overhangs the bottom of the gaps in the ribs for the upper gun port. (The top of the final plank in this step needs to be at least 2mm above the top of frame parts 3c & 7c on the starboard side and 3d & 7d on the port side, and the tops of rib #4 on both sides).

Add two strips 17mm long and glue them so that they overhang rib 2.

Add two strips 16mm long and glue them so that they overhang rib 8.

Add another two strips, each 41mm long. Fit these so that they are placed centrally between the strips added in Steps 10 and 11.

Add another three or four 94mm strips, so that the top strip is just above the level of the quarter deck – just above the tops of the shorter ribs.

Add another four or  five strips to the bulwark, which is formed by the two longest ribs. Cut them so they overhang the ribs a little on both sides. The top strip needs to be level with the top of the rib, or a little higher.

Sand the ends of the planks smooth, and sand the ends of the planks on the bulwark smooth as well, but do not sand the tops of the planks yet.

Now repeat on the opposite side of the hull to make a mirror image.

Constructing the mast step - The mast step is a heavy block of wood that spreads the weight of the mast across several timbers. It is modelled by assembling four pieces of laser-cut plywood to get the required thickness.

Take the four laser-cut parts of the mast step. The inner parts have a rectangular cut-out and the outer parts are – at across the top. Glue the inner parts to the outer parts to make
two identical pairs.

Then glue the two halves together to complete the mast step.

Sand the edges smooth and remove all traces of the charring from the ends and upper surfaces.

Try  fitting the mast step into the notched area in the keelson. You can sand the ends of the step if it will not fit easily. Do not glue the mast step in place yet.


That's it for this stage, carefully store the remaing parts.

Future issues:

Issue 127 - Contains Oak veneer strips and assorted wood strips, cannonballs, brass hinges & pump well parts., and has instructions for shaping the mast and making the pump well and shot lockers.





Tomick attached the following image(s):
X126 -1.JPG
X126-2.JPG
X126-3.JPG
X126-4.JPG
X126-5.JPG
X126-6.JPG
X126-7.JPG
X126-8.JPG
X126-9.JPG
X126-10.JPG
X126-11.JPG
X126-12.JPG
Tomick
#3 Posted : 04 September 2012 16:33:46

Rank: Pro

Groups:

Joined: 24/08/2009
Posts: 23,601
Points: -6,208
Issue 127 - Contains Oak veneer strips and assorted wood strips, cannonballs, brass hinges & pump well parts., and has instructions for shaping the mast and making the pump well and shot lockers.

This time we start making the lower mast using the dowel from Issue 126. The model has a stub mast, so the top end of the dowel is sliced at an angle and will later on be painted red at the cut-off point. You also need to make a square end to fit the mast step, and taper the below deck part of the mast.

The thin strips of oak veneer will be used later on to panel the pump well with realistic planking.

The strip of 10mm wood is used to make internal partitions for the shot lockers. This is optional and only necessary if you intend to fix the lids open to reveal the cannonballs inside.

Shaping the mast -The mast on the real Victory has an off set taper. Its front face is straight, and all the taper is formed on the side of the mast that faces the stern. However, it is much harder to carve the mast like this, and as the dif erence is barely perceptible at the scale size, therefore we recommend creating an even taper.

Shape and taper the mast, using the plan as a reference. The mast is around 10mm longer than can be shown on the plan – just align the bottom.

Take the mast dowel and saw off one end at an angle of about 30 degrees, starting about 5mm from the end. The
precise angle is unimportant, as long as it is aesthetically pleasing, then sand the end smooth.

Measure and mark two lines 4mm and 170mm from the ‹flat end of the mast. Then draw a cross on the end of the mast with both lines going through the centre at a right angle. Then draw an 8mm square on the end of the mast, using the cross as a guide.

Cut off the sides of the square at the 4mm mark, using a razor saw., this forms a square peg on the end of the mast. Check that the peg  fits inside the square socket in the mast step. Do not glue it yet.

Taper the mast from the full 14mm diameter at the 170mm mark down to 12mm at the base as shown on the plan. Sand it with a sanding block while rotating it slowly and steadily. Check the diameter at frequent intervals as shown on the plan.
Use medium or coarse sandpaper for the initial sanding, and end with fine sandpaper to give a smooth  finish.

Making the pump well and shot lockers - This is the basic assembly of the laser-cut parts, later on, you will plank the pump well with oak veneer.

Take the front for the pump well, part 16-1, and the left side, part 15-1. Remove the door from the side and carefuly store it.
The front and left side  fit together by interlocking the tabs. Glue the parts together, and ensure that they
are at right angles to each other.

Add the right side, part 18-1. Again, make sure this is square. Then add the rear of the pump well, 16-2.

It is easier to make the shot lockers with closed lids, but you can opt to hinge a lid open (as on the real ship) to reveal a pile of cannonballs inside. Omit Steps 6-8 and 10-15 if you are leaving the lockers closed. I will be constructing the 'open lid' version as noted below.

Take the two shot locker sides, 15-3 and 18-2. Draw a horizontal line at the bottom of the tab as shown. This line marks the position of the false fldoor. Place one of the sides on the 1.5 x 10mm strip, so that the lower edge of the strip lines up with the recess between the two tabs. Trace off the shape of the top of the side.

Cut off the strip to form a partition about 11mm tall, then repeat the process to make a second partition.

Glue the shot locker sides squarely to the rear of the pump well, with the pencil lines on the inside, (Chamfer the tabs if they do not fit easily into the slots).

Cut a strip of the 1.5 x 10mm wood to fit between the sides of the shot locker. This will be used to make a false ‹floor.
Sand along the length of the false floor until it matches the width of the sides of the shot locker between the tabs.

Mark two lines on the false ‹ floor, dividing the strip evenly into three, then glue the false ‹ oor in place, lining it up below the marks on the shot locker sides. Allow the glue to dry completely.

Fit the partitions against the sides of the shot locker, and trim or sand them so they are exactly the same size and shape, then glue the two partitions onto the pencil marks.

Try the rear wall of the shot locker, part 17, over the keelson to check the fit. Ensure the recess in the base  ts over the three thicker planks. Here, the planks are wider than the recess and actually extend a millimetre beyond the wall.
Adjust the base until the are no gaps along the underside. You may also need to sand the slot for the keelson to get a good fit.

Glue the rear wall to the rear of the shot locker, then glue the top bar, part 19, to the top of the shot locker.

Test-fit the pump well in place in the hull frame. You may need to sand the edges of the shot locker sides to get it to sit flat.

That completes the basic construction of the pump well and shot lockers. If you decided not to show the interior of the lockers, you will have omitted the internal partitions and false ‹floor.

Carefully store the remaing parts, mast and pump well for later use.

Future isues:

Issue 128 contains - Contains laser-cut rider parts, dowel, brass fittings & strip, and a wood strip., and has instructions for completing the hold planking and fitting the riders.


Tomick attached the following image(s):
X127-1.JPG
X127-3.JPG
X127-4.JPG
X127-5.JPG
X127-6.JPG
X127-7.JPG
X127-8.JPG
X127-9.png
X127-10.JPG
X127-11.JPG
X127-11A.JPG
X127-12.JPG
X127-13.JPG
X127-14.JPG
X127-15.JPG
X127-16.JPG
X127-17.JPG
X127-18.JPG
X127-19.JPG
X127-20.JPG
X127-21.JPG
X127-22.JPG
X127-23.JPG
X127-24.JPG
X127-25.JPG
X127-25A.JPG
X127-26.JPG
X127-27.JPG
Tomick
#4 Posted : 13 September 2012 19:29:40

Rank: Pro

Groups:

Joined: 24/08/2009
Posts: 23,601
Points: -6,208
Issue 128 - Contains laser-cut rider parts, dowel, brass fittings & strip, and a wood strip., and has instructions for completing the hold planking, sanding the outer hull planking, and fitting the riders.

Completing the hull planking - You will need some 2 x 5mm planks from Issue 125 and the 1 x 6mm plank from Issue 127.

Take two 94mm lengths of 2 x 5mm planks and test-fit them as shown. Sand and chamfer the top plank until it fits neatly in place under the deck supports with both planks in place. Glue the planks in place. It is easier to fit them both at the same time, rather than one after the other.

Cut a 96mm length of 1 x 6mm wood, and use the jig to mark lines at frames 2, 3, 6, 7 and 8.

Draw a line 4mm from the edge, and then cut 4mm-deep notches, using a fresh knife blade. Repeat this to make a second notched plank, (make the second strip a mirror image so the marks are on opposite sides).

Glue the notched planks in place (making sure the pencil marks are on the inside so that the gaps between the deck supports are covered). Then sand the ends smooth as before

Fitting the riders - On the real Victory, the riders added strength to the hull and helped it to maintain its shape.

Sand the parts smooth after removing them from the sheet, particularly where the attachment tabs are.

Take part 13 and test-fit in position over the keelson. Sand it as necessary to get a good, gap-free fit. Then glue a part 13a to one side and a 13b to the other. Make sure that the assembly stays € at, and allow the glue to dry.
Now add a part 13c to one end of the assembly and a 13d to the other. Again, make sure it stays € at and allow the glue to dry.

Try the frame in position, and make a pencil mark near each end, where the rider touches the lowest of the 1mm planks on the side of the hull.
Then Sand a 1mm recess in each end of the assembly so that it can sit neatly over the planks.

Now repeat the steps to make a total of four assemblies – each rider will consist of a pair of these assemblies glued together.

Glue two of the assemblies together with PVA glue to make a Type 13 rider. Make sure they are perfectly aligned, and weight them down so they will stay € at while the glue dries.

Sand the top of the rider to remove all the charring. Repeat the steps to make a second rider.

Take a part 14 and sand it to fit over the keelson.

Glue on a part 14a and a 14b to the two ends. Note that these have one leg that is slightly longer that the other, and it is this that fits onto part 14. Allow the glue to dry before continuing.

Glue on parts 14c and 14d, (they wil fit on either end), again allowing the glue to dry completely.

Repeat the steps to make a total of four of these Type 14 assemblies.

Test fit the assemblies in place. They should fit just below the 1mm plank on the hull. You can either trim the corners or shorten them slightly if necessary to get the correct  fit.

Glue the assemblies together in pairs to make two more Type 14 riders. Make sure they are perfectly aligned, and weight them down so they wil stay flat while the glue dries.

Sand the tops of the riders to remove all the charring.

Mark lines on the thicker planks on each side of the keel, 20mm from the outer face of frame 8.

Take a Type 14 rider and position it so it sits under the deck support of frame 7, lining it up with the inner edge of frame 7 and the line drawn earlier. Glue it in position and use clamps to hold it in place while the glue dries.

Repeat the process to glue a Type 13 rider in front of the type 14 that you just fitted.

Again draw lines on the thicker planks, this time 15mm from the edge of frame 2, and glue the second Type 14 rider in position, lined up with the edge of frame 3 and the pencil mark.

Glue the second Type 13 rider in place against the type 14 rider that you just  fitted.

Test- fit the pump well. You may need to ease the slots a little with sandpaper or a file. Don’t be concerned about the gaps at the bottom as these will be covered with oak veneer later on. Do not glue the pump well in place.

That's it for this stage, carefully store the remaining fret parts.

Issue 129 - Contains eyebolts, cotton fabric, thread, brass wire, eyebolts and laser-cut stand parts., and has instructions for sanding the hull planking and assembling the stand.

Tomick attached the following image(s):
X128-1.JPG
X128-2.JPG
X128-3.JPG
X128-4.JPG
X128-5.JPG
X128-6.JPG
X128-7.JPG
X128-8.JPG
X128-8A.JPG
X128-9.JPG
X128-10.JPG
X128-11.JPG
X128-11A.JPG
X128-12.JPG
X128-13.JPG
X128-14.JPG
X128-15.JPG
X128-16.JPG
X128-17.JPG
X128-18.JPG
Tomick
#5 Posted : 17 September 2012 16:29:26

Rank: Pro

Groups:

Joined: 24/08/2009
Posts: 23,601
Points: -6,208
Issue 129 - Contains eyebolts, cotton fabric, thread, brass wire, eyebolts and laser-cut stand parts., and has instructions for fitting the false keel, sanding the hull planking and assembling the stand.

Fitting the false keel - Victory’s false keel is a disposable covering that protects the keel itself from damage. It is modelled by simply gluing two strips of wood on top of each other on the keel.

The false keel is created using the length of 1.5 x 8mm wood strip supplied in this issue plus the strip that was included with Issue 125.
On the real ship, the easily replaced false keel was fitted to the bottom of the keel itself, and was intended to protect it from damage if the ship grounded.

Take the 1.5 x 8mm wood strip supplied this issue and the one supplied in issue 125, and cut them each to a length of 92mm.
Glue one of the strips onto the keel and allow the glue to dry. Glue the secind strip on top of the first. When the glue is dry, sand the ends and sides of the strips until smooth.

Sand the outside planking with a medium grade sandpaper, and then finish off with a smooth grade to give a good finish.

Making the display stand - You will need the dowel provided in Issue 125. Take your time putting the stand together, as it is important to get the parts exactly square.

Cut two 90mm lengths of dowel from the piece supplied in Issue 128. Make pencil marks 8mm from each end.
Cut out the two main parts of the stand. Sand any rough edges smooth. Note that the two smaller brackets included in the laser fret will be used to hold a name plaque supplied later in the series, so keep these parts safe for now.
Apply PVA adhesive to one end of one piece of dowel, just outside of the pencil mark. Assemble the parts so that the pencil marks line up with the insides of the two stands. Use a toy brick (or other improvised
square) to ensure the stands are vertical and the glued dowel is square to them. Leave the assembly on a flat surface to dry.

When the glue is dry, separate the unglued joints. Apply glue to one end of the other dowel and fit it to the other side of the stand. Reassemble the stand, making sure it is square. Line up the pencil mark inside the stand and leave to dry.

Take off the back of the stand. Apply glue to the ends of the unglued dowels and replace the back of the stand. Line up the pencil marks, and use a brick to square up the assembly.

Allow the glue to dry completely. Glue some strips of felt or layers of masking tape to the top of the stand to protect the model, then try the cross-section in place.

That's it for this stage, carefully store the remaining fret parts.

Issue 130 - Contains large & small barrels and chain pump castings., and has instructions for cutting the chain pump openings, fitting the mast step & limber boards, and planking the pump well with oak veneer.

Tomick attached the following image(s):
X129-1.JPG
X129-2.JPG
X129-3.JPG
X129-4.JPG
X129-5.JPG
X129-6.JPG
X129-7.JPG
Tomick
#6 Posted : 24 September 2012 11:15:58

Rank: Pro

Groups:

Joined: 24/08/2009
Posts: 23,601
Points: -6,208
Issue 130 - Contains Contains large & small barrels and chain pump castings., and has instructions for cutting the chain pump openings, fitting the mast step & limber boards, and planking the pump well with oak veneer.

Cutting the chain pump openings - The first thing to do is to cut the openings for the chain pumps and prepare the shallow holes into which the elm tree pumps will later be fitted.

Trace or cut out the template on page 10 of the steps, and place it against the keelson and between the riders on the port side, as shown. Mark the pump openings – the squares on each side of the mast step and also the centre of the octagonal outline of the elm tree pump base.

Then repeat on the starboard side, using the starboard template.

Cut through the top planking to create the chain pump openings, then drill a 2mm hole through the planking at the centre of each elm tree pump base, then carefully drill a shallow hole in the plank with a 5mm drill. Turn the 5mm drill by hand, making sure that you only drill part of the way through the plank. Check that the pump column fits neatly in the hole.

Fitting the mast step and limber boards - Now it’s time to fit the mast step that you assembled in Issue 126, along with the limber boards that sit on each side of the keelson to cover the limber channel. You will need the mast step, some left-over 1.5x5mm planking from 125 and the pump well.

Glue the mast step in position, making sure that the square hole is centred over the keelson.

Take some left-over 1.5 x 5mm plank from Issue 125 and chamfer both edges to an angle of 45 degrees.

Measure and cut a length of the chamfered strip and glue it over the limber channel as shown in the steps, and repeat this all the way along the keelson, but leave gaps where the pump openings are.

Stain the hold dark oak. The faces of ribs 2 and 8 will be stained after all the planking is completed, so do not stain them just yet. I used "Ronseal dark oak quick drying woodstain", which is not prone to bleeding along the grain in the same way that a wood dye will.

Take the pump well and shot locker that you assembled in Issue 127, and stain the inside surfaces dark oak ,(including the interior of the shot lockers if you have opted for an "open" shot locker).

Cut away the corners of the aft shot locker wall so that the pump well assembly will sit properly over the keelson. Don’t be concerned about any gaps, as these will be covered with oak veneer later.

Glue the pump well assembly in position, making sure that it is straight.

Planking the pump well - The pump well and shot locker are planked with the oak veneer provided in Issue 127, (the doors and hatches wil be fitted in the next issue).
You have the option of portraying the shot locker open or closed. For the "open" option, follow the instructions, but skip steps 1, 2 and 14, or follow all the steps except 18 for the "closed" option.

My build has followed the "open" shot locker option, and therefore followed the steps to clad the pump well with oak veneer for this version, which also includes adding the shot.

Filling the shot lockers - Divide the cannonballs evenly between the three compartments, then pour a little clear acrylic varnish in each compartment to seal the balls in place.

That's it for this stage, carefully store the remaining parts.

Issue 131 - Contains assorted wood strips, small barrels & buckets and laser-cut orlop beams, and has instructions for completing the shot lockers & pump well door, constructing the hold platforms and adding the orlop beams.

Tomick attached the following image(s):
X130-1.JPG
X130-2.JPG
X130-3.JPG
X130-4.JPG
X130-5.JPG
X130-6.JPG
X130-7.JPG
X130-8.JPG
X130-9.JPG
X130-10.JPG
X130-11.JPG
X130-12.JPG
X130-13.JPG
X130-14.JPG
X130-15.JPG
Users browsing this topic
Guest
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Powered by YAF | YAF © 2003-2009, Yet Another Forum.NET
This page was generated in 0.221 seconds.
DeAgostini