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Sword Beach D-Day Landings Options
Markwarren
#101 Posted : 28 January 2020 20:17:37

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Coming on very nicely Robin, excellent work as usual. I see a picture of the offending airbrush, looks nice and shiny.LOL

Mark
Plymouth57
#102 Posted : 28 January 2020 21:34:19

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Hi there Trev and Mark! Many thanks for those kind words!Blushing
Yep! It's still very shiny Mark!BigGrin Its a basic Chinese Model BD-130A (Cheapo copy of an expensive western airbrush)Blink
I was really lucky to have this, a few years ago my good mate (Godan) wanted me to do a water colour painting for his wife for a Christmas present. It was a picture of a Humpbacked Whale diving under the water and he bought an 'all in' set on ebay with a lovely compressor and two sets of airbrushes, this one and one with the paint reservoir under the barrel. I used them with artist's gouache paints to airbrush in the shafts of light coming down from the surface. (Disappointed that he wouldn't let me add a giant squid or Marineville's Stingray though!)LOL
When it was finished Godan left the compressor and brushes down with me and then found an even better set up on ebay which he bought for himself, 'donating' the first lot to me!Cool Cool Cool
I haven't done that much airbrushing to be honest, I've always found getting the paint mixture and air pressure just right to be more of an art than a science but the beach spraying did come out quite nice!
As for airbrushing weathering on a 1/700 scale tank...hhmmm...NO!Flapper

Robin.
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Plymouth57
#103 Posted : 07 February 2020 18:59:50

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Photos 1 to 4 (courtesy of the Imperial War Museum) illustrate four types of specialised armoured vehicle developed by Percy Hobart and his team. Photo 1 is the mine clearing Flail Tank, also known as the Sherman Crab. This was built onto a standard Sherman chassis (in fact the entire tank) and was a development of the similar flail tank used in North Africa which was built on the British Valentine Tank. The big rotating drum at the front was equipped with a series of heavy chains, each one ending with a medieval looking steel club. As the drum was spun around at high speed the clubs struck or ‘flailed’ the ground ahead detonating any buried mines. The photo shows the flail in the deployed position but not in use, when the drum was rotating the turret was usually pointed to the rear to keep the gun barrel away from the odd errant chain, which might get blown off! When not in use, the entire drum and arm assembly was either raised up or the chains allowed to drag along with the turret pointing forward again, as here. One of the reference sites on the web indicated the big box on the rear and the angled box on the side as ‘counter-weights’. That’s not quite accurate though, the box on the rear is a weight, to counter balance the drum assembly but the angled box (with one on the other side) is actually full of chalk! They allowed a trickle of white chalk to pour out as the tank moved through the mine field, leaving a safe lane marked out. Later versions did away with the chalk and had an explosive charge device with a magazine of marker flags which were ‘shot’ into the ground at regular intervals. For the diorama I’ll be making a couple of these with both ‘up and down’ deployment.
Photo 2 is almost a throw back to the First World War with the Churchill Fascine Carrier. The MkIV Heavy tanks in WW1 carried fascines or bundles of wooden branches to drop into enemy trenches, allowing the tank to carry on advancing. The Churchill’s were equipped to do exactly the same, as you can see down the bottom of this photo, another Churchill has already dropped its fascine allowing this one to get over the ditch.
The third ‘Funny’ shown in Photo 3, is probably the most destructive tank of WW2 – the Churchill AVRE (Armoured Vehicle Royal Engineers). This was armed with an 11 inch spigot mortar which fired a 40lb demolition charge known as the “Flying Dustbin” by the troops. The Churchill’s design was closer to the old WW1 tanks than the more ‘modern’ designs, instead of the usual large road wheels, the Churchill possessed quite small ten inch bogies, twenty two on each side. This system allowed the Churchill far greater climbing abilities than any other tank which ideally suited it to the specialised vehicle role and since the tracks ran around the entire hull side, escape hatches could be placed in the centre of the hull which came in very handy when the AVRE and turret-less bridge layers etc were designed. Another 'plus' was that the Churchill could lose a few of those bogies from shell strikes without any appreciable loss of effectiveness. The Churchill was the heaviest of the British tanks and by the end of the war the ‘Heavy Churchills’ actually had more armour than the German Tigers! Where a Tiger’s 88mm gun could demolish a small house, the AVRE could demolish an armoured bunker AND excavate a new foundation ditch below it!Blink If you look on the side of this tank, just forward of the square plate you can see the rectangular escape hatch mentioned above. This points out this tank as an early Mark, the later versions had a round hatch to reduce metal fatigue in that region. Also, that same square plate and the triangular gubbins ahead of the hatch shows that this tank is actually the same as the vehicle illustrated in Photo 4: the Churchill Carpet Layer, sometimes called the ‘Bobbin Tank’, (the one in Photo 3 is just missing the bobbin struts). The complicated support arrangement shown here in the development stage was greatly simplified by the time the Bobbins went into action, with a simple ‘V’ bracket (which is the one I have to make up – phew!Cool ) Another two variants which I have to make are not shown here but are fairly simple conversions, (one I actually made some months ago), and they are the Churchill Deep Wader, essentially a standard Churchill with high ‘chimneys’ fitted over the exhausts and engine air intake which allowed it to exit the LST’s in four to five feet of water (or cross a shallow river) without drowning the engine (done that one) and the Churchill Crocodile, the most hated Churchill by the Germans as it towed an armoured trailer full of an early form of napalm to incinerate anyone or anything up to three hundred and sixty feet away. Many Crocodile crews wore standard army battledress rather than tank uniforms in case they were forced to bale out!
In the next installment, building the Sherman Crabs, a Churchill Fascine carrier and some Deep Waders (while I’m getting to work on the bobbins!)
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Hobarts Funnies pic 1.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Plymouth57
#104 Posted : 10 February 2020 16:46:11

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Diagram 5 illustrates the separate parts which went into the construction of the Flail assembly. With the exception of the drum itself which was styrene rod, the rest was all made from plasticard sheet from the off-cuts box. Photo 6 shows the completed drum and arms being test fitted onto a resin cast Sherman hull, the inside of the arms needed a little sanding back and even then it was a tight fit! I then had to create a silicone rubber mould to cast that complicated piece in resin. The flail was included with a few other ‘tanky’ bits so as not to waste the rubber but I ended up making a second mould before I could get any good castings from it (even now its about a 50/50 chance of a good one). Note: in this pic I hadn’t yet fitted the rear spacer beam! Two of the rare good castings are shown in Photo 7, as mentioned earlier, I was making two Flails, one working and one raised up. The other good casting that snapped in half whilst trying to sand down the arms a bit more will never be mentioned again!Cursing You will also probably notice I’ve fitted those chalk boxes on at the wrong angle! Fortunately they came off easily and went back properly before the tanks were primed for painting. (I actually tried a couple of times to make a mould of the Sherman hull with the chalk boxes included but again, it was too difficult getting consistant castings, one side or the other ALWAYS had an air bubble. Leaving the Flails for a moment, Photo 8 shows the component parts for the Fascine Carrier. We have the basic Churchill casting with the turret cut off and glued back on facing backwards and another piece of styrene rod, this time a larger diameter than the Flail’s drum. The ‘branches’ are the same styrene rod heated over a candle flame and stretched out to create the thin rods shown here. The thick rod became the core of the fascine, cut to width and then encased in a layer of the stretched rods shown going on with liquid poly glue as in Photo 9. When the core was completely covered I then glued more rods in the ends, creating the impression that the whole bundle was thin sections once the excess was sliced away as shown in Photo 10. The only other addition was the bar across the hull front seen here. Once painted, I’ll add some support cables from the elastic rigging thread before the vehicle is fixed to the base. Once again, I did try and mould a complete vehicle carrying the fascine but the old air bubble problem crept in again. In the end I moulded the fascine on its own for simplicity. I’ve cast a few of them now so I will probably do a few more of these with the AVRE mortar instead of the gun. The simplest conversion of all (apart from the AVRE shown below) is illustrated in Photo 11. All the Deep Waders required was three pieces of plasticard to represent the snorkels over the engine, as seen in Photo 12. When I tried to cast a complete wader, as usual the three little thin protruding bits equalled air bubbles and you can guess the rest. I can usually cast the two side snorkels and then simply glue a rear one on after! Photos 13 to 15 show the painting procedure for these tiny items. After super-gluing a stretched sprue gun barrel onto the turret up to five or six castings are temporarily glued to a lolly stick with Deluxe Card Glue and once dry, primed with Vallejo Grey Surface Primer. They are then painted with Mig Acrylic Russian Green (which is actually closer to the Olive Green in this small scale) and then later given a Citadel Skaven Brown ink wash. Once all dried they are then dry-brushed with Vallejo Khaki for the highlights before painting the tracks with Mig Polished Metal followed with a thinned Citadel Rust Brown wash to add a bit of rusty ‘dulling down’. Note the AVRE with its Petard Mortar barrel made from brass tubing instead of the stretched sprue.
The latest additions are shown in Photo 16 with the Fascine Carrier at the back with its reversed turret. Moving back to the pair of Flails, they have also had the same painting procedure as shown in Photo 17 and then received their ‘chain’ flails. This was a single strand of 0.2mm electrical wire (16/02 cable) which was gripped between a pair of pliers and a mini vice and pulled, stretching the wire about two inches, making it even thinner and dead straight. I then cut the wire into 1cm or so lengths and curved one end around a mini round file to approximately the same diameter as the drum. The curved end was then dipped in a little pool of super glue and carefully applied to the drum with micro tweezers. Once in the right position it was allowed to set for a few seconds before teasing into shape and trimming to length with tiny micro scissors. (This was not all plain sailing – that wire has a mind of its own!)Blink I had been puzzling on how (and whether) I could form the steel clubs on the ends of the chains and the answer in the end was quite simple – Photo 18 shows what’s left of my 40+ year old pot of Citadel Bolt Gun Metal acrylic (gun metal to you and me!) This is more like a thick treacle than the lovely paint it once was but as you can see, scraping a big dollop out on a coffee stirrer and taking a smaller dollop on the point of a cocktail stick allowed me to carefully touch the end of each chain leaving a self rounding blob which dried into a club! Just goes to prove in this hobby – never throw anything away!Cool
Finally I couldn’t resist the last shot in Photo 19 if only to prove that in WW2, Sherman Tanks’s really were two a penny! (Sorry!)Blushing(Still need to dry-brush the gun barrels yet!)
In the next installment, finishing off the beach and finally getting the resin base glued to the seascape section.
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Hobarts Funnies pic 2.JPG
Hobarts Funnies pic 3.JPG
Hobarts Funnies pic 4.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
birdaj2
#105 Posted : 10 February 2020 19:48:17

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brilliant stuff as always Robin.

Missed the last update but the beach looks really good e with the area closer to what would be the sea being darker showing it would be wet - neat idea to replicate in your mode.

Your little tanks are just something else. So much detail in such a small "package".

Very impressed with the Sherman crab and carpet layer.

Hope it all continues well.

Tony
Happy Modelling

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Gandale
#106 Posted : 11 February 2020 00:51:43

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Am utterly speechless with the detail you've achieved on something so small... Brilliant work....Love Love

Regards

Alan
Markwarren
#107 Posted : 11 February 2020 08:50:13

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Stunning work Robin, Love Drool
it must take some time to get those eyes back to normal after making themLOL

Mark
tf64
#108 Posted : 11 February 2020 16:37:37

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Robin,

Totally lost for words, how can you work so small !!

Well done

Trev
Building: Artesania Stage-Coach H.M.S.Victory / H.M.S. Victory Cross Section / De-Agostini Spitfire.

Full Kits: San Francisco. De-Ago Bremen. Sovereign of the seas. Artesania Stage-Coach Number 2.

Finished builds: Westland Lysander MK.11 plus large Diorama.

mogwai
#109 Posted : 11 February 2020 20:38:48

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Amazing work on such tiddly lil tanks ,bin following this with great interest. Cheers mick. BigGrin
Builds hms victory, suzuki gsx 1300 R hayabusa, honda C B 750, lamborghini countach L P 500 S, tamiya 1/16 rc full option tiger 1 tank,
built, Mclaren M P 4 - 23. Occre london tram,
Stash.airfix 1/24 mosquito. Diag Virginia schooner, tamiya 1/6 honda 750, tamiya 1/35 famo, tamiya 1/35 flak 88.
Kev the Modeller
#110 Posted : 16 February 2020 14:16:34

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Brilliant work as always Robin and your build is always interesting to follow. If you hadn't placed the penny on your 1cm square cutting mat, I'd have sworn that you secretly cast a 6 inch diameter resin penny and painted it copper! How on earth do you get such detail in that scale and still fit two on a penny with room to spare!?

The old saying that such things are "two a penny" was obviously incorrect - to do what you've done is quite uncommon!

Very well done. ThumpUp Drool Drool


Kev Smile
Per Ardua Ad Astra
Plymouth57
#111 Posted : 20 February 2020 21:25:11

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Many thanks indeed to Tony, Alan, Mark, Trev, Mick and Kev for those kind words!Blushing Blushing Blushing
You're right though, sometimes it does take a while for my eyes to get back to normal vision after some of this work, even worse at the minute as you'll see later - if you think these tanks are small, wait till you meet the crew figures!Blink
Joking aside, (I wish!), before continuing on here's a quick look (sort of pun intended) at what I use for the 'close up' work. In the top pic we have my prescription reading glasses on the right. To their left are two pairs of cheapie plastic reading glasses, one at 2x and the other at 3x. On the left is another pair of readers, this time glass lenses at 3.5x, all of these were Poundshop buys! Basically I wear the reading glasses as normal and then perch one of the other ones in front turning the double lens into a binocular viewer. This is what I've used on all the ultra small parts, in the lower pic is a commercial magnifier visor which I've used a lot in the past. The problem with that one is that I can't get close enough to the parts without bumping into the plastic lens, the glasses allow much closer working.Cool
On with the beach!
Still working on the Churchill AVRE Carpet Layer ( its almost as complicated as the Flail tank!) So it’s back to the main base for a bit! At this moment the resin base casting is safely glued onto the frame/seascape (though not without some persuasion!) I’ve also managed to get the first layer of ‘water’ on but more on that when we get there! Photo 1 is a recap of where the beach was before nipping off to Hobart-ise some tanks. The beach had been spray-can primed (but I should have Vallejo Surface Primed it as well) and then given multiple coats of Mig Sand Yellow followed by a matt varnish and an air-brushed tide mark. That was as far as I could go until the items in Photo 2 were obtained. I had a go at making my own DIY weathering powders, following the videos on Youtube but I found that the finely ground artists pastels just didn’t have the same covering power as the commercial powders. It didn’t help that the video I followed said DON’T use Oil Pastels and then a comments section on another site also complaining about covering power said USE Oil Pastels! I did grind up a white and a sandy yellow pastel and thought it wasn’t doing anything but I noticed after that whilst it didn’t add any colour to the beach, where there was a little semi-gloss paint left on there, it was turned a dead matt, so it was doing something (just not what I wanted!)BigGrin Shown in Photo 2 is a bottle of Humbrol White weathering powder, which I bought from the local Antics together with a bottle of Beach Sand (the colour, not the actual sand) from a company called Kromlech, bought on Ebay. I’d never heard of them until they came up whilst searching. The Humbrol was £4.99 for 28ml whilst the Kromlech was £3.00 plus £1.50 postage for interestingly, as it comes in a smaller bottle, 30ml! Whilst I was waiting for the Kromlech to arrive, I used the Humbrol White to shade around the top-most part of the beach where the sand would be driest as shown in Photo 3. This was applied mostly with a cotton bud, I found a stiff flat brush tended to just flick the powder around rather than depositing it on the model. The next job was to start on the shell craters dotted around the beach. The first application was with the Carr’s Shades of Mud, the reddy brown one, applied with the bud at first and then brushed outwards from the crater with a fairly stiff quarter inch natural bristle brush to create the ejecta spread. The right hand side is shown under way in Photo 4. I then deepened the craters with a splash of the darker ‘dog poo’ brown by simply dipping the bud in the powder and spinning the head of the bud inside the crater.
It was at this point that the Kromlech Beach Sand powder arrived and I was able to tone down the cratering a little. I didn’t get the photos in quite the right order here, (actually I didn’t photograph the powders until after I’d completed the weathering) but if you nip on to Photo 9 you can see what I did! The white highlighting at the top of the beach and the reddish ejecta from the craters were a little too harsh and needed reducing back a bit. This was accomplished by creating a mix of the Humbrol White and the Kromlech Beach Sand (roughly 50/50) producing a lighter sand which was then dusted by brush and cotton bud to lighten the craters and ‘sandify’ the white. The final colours can be seen in Photo 5 (apologies for the focus).
Photos 6 and 7 are a quick recap of the two ‘Funnies’. Photo 6 is the completed Armoured Ramp, as you might remember the hull section is an integral part of the base casting (a nightmare to paint) and here it is now with the end ramps finally added on. These had to wait until the beach was finished off of course. Now its just waiting for whichever tank will be trundling over the top of it. Photo 7 is the Fascine carrier finished off with the EZ elastic rope ‘securing’ the fascine in place.
Photo 8 shows the resin base during its gluing in position onto the Perspex sea base. This was glued with a contact adhesive which should have had an instant grip and bond but still needed clamping for a few hours as seen here! The LSTs aren’t fixed down yet, I’m still deciding what’s going where and once decided, I’ll have to go back to the weathering powders again to add in dark tracks from the beached LSTs leading up to the beach exits. With six LSTs, four LSIs and half a million landing craft it’s going to get crowded down there!Blink
Photo 9 came earlier, and Photo 10 illustrates the back of the resin base after gluing on a wood veneer strip. The two side sections were veneered as well using left over Sapele veneer planks from my forty year old Constructo ‘English Frigate “Grimsby” kit. (With only twelve guns she’s actually more of a Gun-brig than a frigate but she was my first ever wooden ship model – and I learned a lot building her too!) Once the Sapele veneers were dried they were given a couple coats of clear gloss Poundshop Yacht Varnish to seal them in and match them up to the previously stained and varnished wooden frame. Finally, Photos 10 and 11 show the base from front and back as it appeared before the next phase began – covering the printed sea effect base with a layer of clear casting resin to seal everything together. More on that soon!
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Magnifiers pic.JPG
The Beach pic 1.JPG
The Beach pic 2.JPG
The Beach pic 3.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Gandale
#112 Posted : 21 February 2020 00:07:17

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More amazing work, dio is really looking fab....Drool Love Drool Love

Regards

Alan
Markwarren
#113 Posted : 22 February 2020 10:30:02

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looking great, really coming together now.Love Love

Mark
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