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Sword Beach D-Day Landings Options
Plymouth57
#21 Posted : 06 May 2019 15:49:53

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Grateful thanks again to Tony, Kev and Alan! Blushing Currently working on the last of the ships - a trio of LSMs or Landing Ship Mechanical (or sometimes Medium). These are the bigger of the LCTs with opening bows like a car ferry. I thought they would be the easiest of the vessels to make and paint but they're not! The cargo deck is not as wide as the smaller type and the hull sides are higher which makes getting the paintbrush in to get a good straight line flipping difficult! More on them later!BigGrin
Tony, my first attempt into resin casting was with the American Alumilite product which I bought through the Hobby's catalogue. Its a good resin but quite pricey over here, but then I discovered a British company called DWR Plastics which, in my opinion is superior in every way. First of all its far cheaper as you'll see below and on top of that I think its a finer or more fluid mix which takes up better detail in the mould. I use the Fast Cure Beige resin which is mixed 1:1 A and B. Once mixed you only have about 3 minutes to get it poured in before the curing begins and the hardened casting can be removed after about 30 minutes. I have tried the slow cure version as well which gives about 20 minutes to pour but that needs hours to cure before removing and still takes about 72 hours before its fully hard. On the Chindit bust model I also used the Roto/Slush resin which is a different method to create a hollow casting - more effort but you save a heck of a lot of resin on bigger moulds!
As for the moulds themselves, DWR produce a Silicone rubber and Catalyst set which is excellent - takes a couple of hours to cure at room temperature although an attic workroom at 100 degrees plus can be a problem during a heatwave!Crying The other good point is that the DWR resins are non toxic so there are no problems sanding the stuff afterwards.
The resin begins with 250gm sets for £4.50, 500gm for £9.00 and the one I use now the 1kg set at £14.40 They go all the way up to Jerrycan size for hundreds of pounds but I find the 1kg will be used up before it 'ages' after about 18 months (still usable but not such fine detail)
The rubber is available from 515gm and up, £7.60 for 515gm, £13 for 1.03kg and the one I use now, the 2kg at £23.85. The 1kg comes in a large plastic tub and the 2kg in a larger plastic can. I use it from the tub and simply refill that from the can when it runs out - lass of a footprint on the worktop that way!
The Roto/Slush is slightly dearer at £5.50 for 250gm and £17 for 1kg. On top of the product price its about £5-6 for postage (they're quite heavy!) You will also need a good mini digital scale to accurately weigh the resin or rubber out - mine is a dinky little thing from ebay, measures 5 inches by 3 inches, accurate to 1/100 gram and cost under a fiver! I also bought a pack of 3ml disposable pipettes to measure out the resins and catalyst and a pack of 25ml plastic pots (like you get with cough medicines) to mix the resin in, both packs cost a couple of pounds. To mix up the silicone rubber I use washed out desert pots from Iceland (leave the mixing stick in the pot with the residue and you can pull the rubber skin right off leaving the pot clean again!)Cool
You can find DWR advertising on Ebay or you can go direct to the firm's own mail order site at www.dwrplastics.com I would highly recommend them for beginners, let me know how you get on, its a really fascinating part of this hobby and can save pounds in the long run (look at me - I've got a whole navy now!)LOL

Robin.
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
birdaj2
#22 Posted : 06 May 2019 15:55:00

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Robin

Many thanks for taking the time to update on that resins query from me.

I shall get myself onto ebay later and look this one out.

Thanks again and happy building on the rest of your model.

Tony
Happy Modelling

Tony

Project: USS Constitution - subscribed to the 24 month option
Project: Porsche 911 - subscribed to the 24 month option
Project: back on the Jaguar build
Project: Harley Davidson Fat boy
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Project: 1:200 Bismarck (hachette)
Plymouth57
#23 Posted : 14 May 2019 20:29:17

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Thanks again to Kev and Alan, much appreciated as always!Blushing One thing I forgot to say to Tony regarding wastage with home cast resin, what I've done is to have a few moulds around which can be filled in stages without affecting the end result. These are 'dumping moulds' which I can pour any excess resin into during the casting process - during the Chindit build it was the head mould, by the end of the project I had a half dozen heads, some of which I then used to practice the face painting on. In this build its a couple of moulds for casting the buildings which you'll see later on the beach front. The final ones will be heavily 'personalised' with shell damage etc but it means there is actually little to no wastage of the resin at all!BigGrin
So on to the first of the tank landing craft (or landing craft tank!)Blushing
Photo 1 shows a close relative of the LCT I’m modelling here. I couldn’t find an exact match but this one is roughly the same apart from having her pair of 20mm AA guns on the stern deck behind the bridge whereas mine has a pair of bridge wings with the Oerlikons positioned on those. As mentioned earlier, after D-Day when the LCTs were used more and more as large troop transports, those still transporting tanks were renamed as LSTs. Officially this meant Landing Ship Tank but according to many of the crews it stood for something a little different: Large Stationary Target! LOL
Photo 2 illustrates the parts for the LCT on the Skywave sprue. As mentioned earlier, this craft comes in two versions in the kit – the LCT and the LCT(R). Curiously, although the bigger LCT (or actually LSM), which I’ll be adding later, has a detailed cargo deck moulded with steel plating, both of these vessels have a plain deck (complete with injection moulding circles). The rocket version has its deck covered by the rocket battery and this one comes complete with a canvas cover which I won’t be using, but you’d think as most of this type were open topped and loaded with tanks which the model might be expected to portray, they’d have put some kind of detailed decking down there!Blink Unlike the other LCT, there was a slight problem in the construction of this one – as you can see in Photo 3, there’s a dirty great gap under the stern deck when the hull is glued on to the waterline base! For all I know there may well be an open section down there on the real thing and ordinarily, this wouldn’t be a problem, except of course if using the original to cast replicas! Pour the liquid silicone over this and it would all flow happily under the stern locking the hull into the mould forever! The solution is very simple and involves adding a plasticard inner bulkhead around the tank deck as shown in Photo 4. This seals off the gap at the back and I only needed to add a little Milliput putty at the end of the plasticard at the bows to seal off the ends to prevent the rubber getting in behind.
Photo 5 shows the ‘coming together’ of the small parts mould I mentioned earlier. This consists of the little parts of the LCI from the top left (two ramps and gantry with the life boat (including a resin copy making a copy of a copy, can’t have too many life boats), and the two life rafts. To the right of those is the large internal ramp for the larger LSM whilst along the bottom is the bow ramp and bridge for this type of LCT. To use up the rest of the space I also stuck in three of the little resin Churchill tanks. The three castings are illustrated in Photo 6, at the rear is the first casting which I carried on through the entire process to complete it before starting the next two – that one taught me a couple of points which changed the way Numbers 2 and 3 were made afterwards! I think when modelling multiple models of a home made resin cast, its well worth taking the first example through the entire process – construction, priming, painting, weathering and adding any extra details. In all three of the ships, building one right through has provided tips and procedures, which made numbers two and three (and four in the case of the LCIs) easier to work with than the first one! In the foreground is a bare resin hull and in the middle a grey primed hull ready to begin the painting. The prototype was modelled with the ramp closed and a full complement of Shermans, the other two have their ramps down and will be unloading onto the beach. This first example is shown again in Photo 7 with the traditional penny for a size comparison. When I constructed this one, I glued the bridge complete with its mast on before spraying it with the primer. I then discovered it was a nightmare trying to paint the superstructure under those wings! That’s why the other two shown beside it in the last photo have no bridge on as yet – the bridges were primed and painted separately as can be seen in Photo 8, which illustrates the painting phases. Also, after supergluing the elastic rigging to the prototype, I glued the second pair’s rigging to the deck before the bridge went on too! As you might notice in Photo 7, it was taken before the long PE ship’s rails had arrived from China! I did have the other type of rail used on the LCIs but I needed the longer type seen here (I’ve got about four different sorts now as you might have seen in the last posting!) The first example with the tanks now also has some tank crew stood among the vehicles but I’ll keep those pics back for the installment on the figures! The painting procedure was pretty much the same as the LCIs with the same light grey and blue camouflage and washed/dry-brushed decks, the only addition was I gave the tank deck and the inner hull bulkheads a wash of Citadel Rust Ink to give them a rusty, grimy appearance . All three are now completed apart from the tanks, I’m still deciding which ones to put in them yet!
In the next installment, another of the ‘Funnies’: the Churchill Bridge Layer.
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
LCT Type 1 pic 1.JPG
LCT Type 1 pic 2.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
birdaj2
#24 Posted : 14 May 2019 21:15:46

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Robin

Another great update.

Thanks for the tips on using the resin.

I still have this lined up for later in the year so i will let you know how i get on.

Tony
Happy Modelling

Tony

Project: USS Constitution - subscribed to the 24 month option
Project: Porsche 911 - subscribed to the 24 month option
Project: back on the Jaguar build
Project: Harley Davidson Fat boy
Project: Lam. Countach
Project: 1:200 Bismarck (hachette)
tf64
#25 Posted : 15 May 2019 05:58:39

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Hi Robin,Great update thanks for posting.

Trev.
Building: Artesania Stage-Coach. H.M.S.Victory / H.M.S. Victory Cross Section / De-Agostini Spitfire.

Full Kits: San Francisco. De-Ago Bremen.Sovereign of the seas.

Gandale
#26 Posted : 15 May 2019 08:12:49

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Hi Robin, all very interesting and looking great.... Going to be another fab dio when complete.....Drool Drool

Regards

Alan
Markwarren
#27 Posted : 15 May 2019 14:37:09

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Looking excellent Robin. Love Going to be a great dio when finished.

Mark
Kev the Modeller
#28 Posted : 19 May 2019 21:27:47

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Brilliant modelling as always Robin, a joy to watch you construct these dioramas and a great insight into how you do it!

Very well done mate, looking forward to seeing how you build the Churchill Bridge Layer! Drool ThumpUp

Kev Smile
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